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CareOne / Care One – Scam, Complaint, Review, or Praise?

Please share your experience with this debt relief company and provide your review and feedback, in the comments section below.

The goal of this page is to allow people to share information that may be important to help others to make a more informed decision regarding their experience with this debt relief company. Here are some potential questions you might be able to provide feedback about.

  • How did you feel about the customer service experience you received?
  • Was the company easy to communicate with before or after you became a client?
  • Did the company respond to your communications promptly?
  • What were the fees charged for the services you received?
  • Did the company give you the terms and conditions for the program you were interested in before you gave them any personal information?
  • Was the program successful for you and accomplish the goals you had when you entered the program?
  • Did you have a really good experience you can share?
  • Did you have a bad experience you want to share?
  • Is there any other information you’d like people to know that might be considering the services of this company?

It is important to understand when reading comments below that they are the opinions of the individual posters and may not be representative of the overall impression of all consumers that may have or have not used the debt relief services of this company. But everyone does deserve to have an opportunity to express their opinion, even the debt relief company itself, be it good, bad, or indifferent.

CareOne / Care One   Scam, Complaint, Review, or Praise?
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Steve Rhode
Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.
  • Errick

    CareOne debt settlement is a scam, and everyone who is talking about high fees and advance fees and BBB ratings and puffball AG settlements is missing the scam. Their customers are set up to fail.

    You tell your mark, I mean customer, just pay 50 cents for each dollar of your debts, and you will try to settle them. Your fee is just 15 cents, sounds great right? Then you turn around and settle their debts for 45 cents, holy mackerel you’re a hero! But wait, that settlement didn’t cost your mark 45 cents, it actually cost 60 cents with the fees. But the scam, I mean plan, buries that in the fine print of budgets and schedules and estimates. So the mark is faithfully pumping 50 cents each month into the scam, each time getting 10 cents further away from the financial freedom you described in vivid detail, but were very careful not to actually promise anyone.

    No one survives this, except a few of the small number of victims whose plans balance, who pay at least the gross settlement amount without fail for FIVE YEARS. And don’t get sued in that time. Which thanks to the debt buyers, is nobody.

    The best scams are simple for two reasons. First, your mark has to think it can’t be that simple, I’m a reasonable person and I think I would have seen something like this coming. Second, you have to make your mark embarrassed to come forward after you took them because only an idiot would have fallen for it.

    45+15=50. Can’t get simpler than that.

    This is why CareOne wants everyone to play by the same rules, because they actually benefit from the advance fee ban, but only if everyone has to play. Nowadays they take on average about 61 cents from the client for every dollar of debt. They settle at about 48 cents, which makes their fee about 21 cents, for a gross settlement cost of 69 cents. Every settlement puts the client eight cents on the dollar closer to being out of money and out of their hair. And the beauty is, you took your mark while looking like you succeeded. Only someone exempt from the advance fee ban can beat that.

    But wait, there’s more! Thanks to contingent fees, you have reverse-leveraged the mark even closer to imminent doom. Now even an awesome settlement, say 35 cents on the dollar, which used to cost 50 cents, now costs 61 cents! You’ve only scammed half of your customers at that level, but oh well tomorrow is another day.

    One might think the sales staff would revolt by the squeeze on their commissions. But thanks to Uncle Sam, what is their option? It’s now a price-controlled market. CareOne and the “coaches” will meet in the middle of this rock-solid cash flow, which is now even more secure because you haven’t “taken” any money until you’ve taken the mark. Look officer, I am just doing my job here.

    Even the regulators will not be able to get at this one. The FTC has put the gold seal of approval on the scam, all you have to do is NOT talk about the difference between gross and net settlements, and obey the advance fee ban and disclosure requirements, and it’s legal enough for the pencil pushers. It’s not even really deceptive, all the information you need to make the scam is right there in the papers. You told us you read it, you wouldn’t lie to us would you?

  • Errick

    CareOne debt settlement is a scam, and everyone who is talking about high fees and advance fees and BBB ratings and puffball AG settlements is missing the scam. Their customers are set up to fail.

    You tell your mark, I mean customer, just pay 50 cents for each dollar of your debts, and you will try to settle them. Your fee is just 15 cents, sounds great right? Then you turn around and settle their debts for 45 cents, holy mackerel you’re a hero! But wait, that settlement didn’t cost your mark 45 cents, it actually cost 60 cents with the fees. But the scam, I mean plan, buries that in the fine print of budgets and schedules and estimates. So the mark is faithfully pumping 50 cents each month into the scam, each time getting 10 cents further away from the financial freedom you described in vivid detail, but were very careful not to actually promise anyone.

    No one survives this, except a few of the small number of victims whose plans balance, who pay at least the gross settlement amount without fail for FIVE YEARS. And don’t get sued in that time. Which thanks to the debt buyers, is nobody.

    The best scams are simple for two reasons. First, your mark has to think it can’t be that simple, I’m a reasonable person and I think I would have seen something like this coming. Second, you have to make your mark embarrassed to come forward after you took them because only an idiot would have fallen for it.

    45+15=50. Can’t get simpler than that.

    This is why CareOne wants everyone to play by the same rules, because they actually benefit from the advance fee ban, but only if everyone has to play. Nowadays they take on average about 61 cents from the client for every dollar of debt. They settle at about 48 cents, which makes their fee about 21 cents, for a gross settlement cost of 69 cents. Every settlement puts the client eight cents on the dollar closer to being out of money and out of their hair. And the beauty is, you took your mark while looking like you succeeded. Only someone exempt from the advance fee ban can beat that.

    But wait, there’s more! Thanks to contingent fees, you have reverse-leveraged the mark even closer to imminent doom. Now even an awesome settlement, say 35 cents on the dollar, which used to cost 50 cents, now costs 61 cents! You’ve only scammed half of your customers at that level, but oh well tomorrow is another day.

    One might think the sales staff would revolt by the squeeze on their commissions. But thanks to Uncle Sam, what is their option? It’s now a price-controlled market. CareOne and the “coaches” will meet in the middle of this rock-solid cash flow, which is now even more secure because you haven’t “taken” any money until you’ve taken the mark. Look officer, I am just doing my job here.

    Even the regulators will not be able to get at this one. The FTC has put the gold seal of approval on the scam, all you have to do is NOT talk about the difference between gross and net settlements, and obey the advance fee ban and disclosure requirements, and it’s legal enough for the pencil pushers. It’s not even really deceptive, all the information you need to make the scam is right there in the papers. You told us you read it, you wouldn’t lie to us would you?

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