Latest Posts
Home > Ask The Get Out of Debt Experts > Disabled Military Vet Wonders What to Do About Letting His Home Go.

Disabled Military Vet Wonders What to Do About Letting His Home Go.

“Dear Steve,

I am an disabled American War Veteran, Husband and father of three. I own a home in New Jersey and my employer (Federal Government) decided to move me to North Carolina. I have since rented a home here, but we decided to buy here also. The mortgage on the second home is about the same as the rent. My problem is; When I bought my home in Jersey 2009. It appraised for 407K. Today it appraises for less then 320K. I owe 339K. The Mortgage taxes escrow adds up to 2988 a month. We have moved permanently to NC. I can’t sell the house so I am thinking about foreclosing so I do not have to have the New Jersey mortgage, while I support my family in NC. I make decent money, but I really don’t want to pay two mortgages and I have 2 kids in college.

William”

Don’t miss our free Get Out of Debt – “How To” Guide Series on a number of topics, for loads of practical advice, tips, and help to beat back debt. – Click Here

The Answer

Dear William,

For the most part the decision has been made for you. The two choices are to try to go for a short sale in the NJ house and then potentially have a deficit balance to deal with, hand the house back or let the home go. Even if you could get your lender to modify the mortgage it doesn’t sound like it would be affordable in your situation.

I’m not sure if the mortgage was a VA mortgage or not. If it was then a deed in lieu of foreclosure might make sense. The VA says:

If you will be unable to cure the default, and a private sale does not appear realistic, VA will consider accepting a deed in lieu of foreclosure. If there are no liens on the property, and VA agrees to accept a deed, you will have to sign legal papers making VA the owner of the property. Normally, VA will have to pay your loan holder a claim for the difference between the value of the property and the amount you owe on the loan. If a deed is accepted, you may be released from all further liability, or you may be asked to agree to repay the Government for all or part of the claim we paid. VA representatives can discuss this with you in detail.

If you eventually find yourself letting the NJ house go and you are left with a huge deficiency you owe then it might make good sense to consider a follow-up bankruptcy to eliminate that debt.

Please update me on your progress by posting updates here in the comments section of your question. I’m very interested in how this works out for you.

Big Hug!

Disabled Military Vet Wonders What to Do About Letting His Home Go.
Get Out of Debt Guy – Twitter, G+, Facebook

If you have a credit or debt question you’d like to ask just use the online form. I’m happy to help you totally for free.

Disabled Military Vet Wonders What to Do About Letting His Home Go. by

Share This and Spread the Word

About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode
Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.
  • Glowvan

    I am a retired disabled vet who owns a home with a va loan in another state…it has been rented for 14 years but the renters have not paid the rent for the last two months and I cannot make that payment without their rent payments…I went through a bankruptcy back in Dec 2006 and the loan on this house was never re-affirmed but i have continued to make the payments until now…if I let this loan go to forclosure can they take the funds out of my disability pay? I also have a second mortgage on the home…which made it impossible to sell.

    Kelly

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      I’d give your bankruptcy attorney a call and talk it over with them.

  • Steve Rhode

    Here is the link to the VA page I got the information from. http://www.vba.va.gov/ro/cleve

  • army wife

    Wrong! there are programs for Veterans to be able to short sale their home. Look on the VA website. Foreclosure is bad for you especially being employed by the government. Please look into all options before killing your credit completely!

  • army wife

    Wrong! there are programs for Veterans to be able to short sale their home. Look on the VA website. Foreclosure is bad for you especially being employed by the government. Please look into all options before killing your credit completely!

Get My FREE Get Out of Debt Guy Newsletter

It is the smart thing to do.

I promise to keep your email safe and secure.

Close

I want to keep you posted each weekday with just one email about the latest get out of debt news, scam alerts and information to beat back debt.

You can unsubscribe at any time with just one click.

After you subscribe, check your email to confirm your subscription. If the confirmation email does not appear in your inbox in a few minutes, check your spam folder for it. Sometimes it likes to annoyingly hide there.


  • It will keep you posted on the latest scams.
  • You will be alerted to the latest articles.
  • You will wind up smarter than everyone else dealing with debt.