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Student Loans and Suicide. I’m a Lawyer Living in a Hovel in New York With Private Student Loan Debt and Thinking of Becoming an Escort.

“Dear Steve,

I have defaulted on $90,000 in student loans. The remainder of my loans (I believe they are now somewhere around $100,000) are in forbearance. Last year I made a total of about $40,000, first as a temporary administrative assistant and then as a full-time employee of a corporation. Unable to find a job, I attempted to start my own law practice, which was almost as much of a waste of time and money as getting a law degree. I foresaw disaster in 2008 when some of my loans went into repayment. I called my lender, Citibank, several times to see if we could work out a payment plan that I could stick to but was told multiple times that my only option was default. By 2009 I had used all the deferment and forbearance time for certain loans.

I now take home $3600 a month as a legislative analyst. I live in a hovel in New York, paying $1,200 a month for rent and, in the winter, more than $200 a month for gas and electricity. I cannot find a landlord who will rent to me given my credit score (which says nothing about my history of paying rent on time–fortunately, I have had no problems paying rent yet). I would like to move to a cheaper apartment, but I’m afraid that won’t be possible with my credit score. If I move back in with my parents, I will have to quit my job. My parents live in a small town in Texas. I’m not sure what my job prospects would be there.

According to Citibank, my defaulted loans have been sold, but according to the collections agency, DCS, they have not. I really don’t know their status, other than that they are in default. I know that I cannot get a pay raise at my job because salaries have been frozen for three years, so I am currently applying for higher paying jobs and hoping that the hiring companies don’t require a credit check. I have looked into escort services as a way to make money on the side but am terrified of being raped or getting an STD and frankly don’t think there is much of a market for someone who looks like me.

I guess my question is whether I should try anything else before committing suicide. I understand that nothing is free, including “education,” but I feel that now I am being disproportionately punished for my crime of stupidity (the crime of thinking that I could go to law school, become a lawyer, and make enough money to pay for law school and lead a better life than my parents have led). I am completely miserable and see no hope whatsoever, especially in light of the fact that people who owe less than a quarter of what I owe are contemplating suicide.

I would greatly appreciate a response, even if it is just to confirm that there is no hope.

Thank you.”

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The Answer

Okay, thank you for reaching out to me for help. The first thing we need to do is regroup and take a few really deep breaths.

I can certainly hear your pain and frustration that is running through your life at the moment. Thoughts of suicide, becoming an escort and other solutions to address the situation.

It appears to me that we have two issues here. The first is the underlying student loans. The second is the impact the loans are having on your life.

If I could wave a wand I’d want you to get your energy aligned to focus on overcoming the student loan problem. If you can take the life moments that you are otherwise spending on wild thoughts on how to deal with the debt and make it your mission to tackle the underlying situation, it will give you some focus and clarity.

Private student loans are among the worst financial trap in America. More is owed now for student loans than all credit card debt combined and for the most part student loans fall into two buckets.

Government backed student loans have some good options for dealing with them. Private student loans have fewer options.

Here are some things to explore.

  1. If any of your student loans are government backed then it might be possible to consolidate those loans into a government backed loan that has some good repayment alternatives like the Income Based Repayment Program (IBR).
  2. It is true that for the most part student loans cannot be discharged in bankruptcy but there is an exception.

    Under § 523(a)(8) of the Bankruptcy Code, student loans are nondischargeable unless repayment of the loan would impose an undue hardship on the debtor. The burden of establishing undue hardship, by a preponderance of the evidence, is on the debtor. The Code contains no definition of the phrase “undue hardship” and interpretation of the concept has been left to the courts. In this Circuit, the applicable standard is the “totality of the circumstances” test as set forth in Andrews. In applying this approach, the courts are to consider: (1) the debtor’s past, current and reasonably reliable future financial resources; (2) the reasonable necessary living expenses of the debtor and the debtor’s dependents; and (3) and any other relevant facts and circumstances unique to the particular case.

    The principal inquiry is to determine whether “the debtor’s reasonable future financial resources will sufficiently cover payment of the student loan debt – while still allowing for a minimal standard of living”; if so, the indebtedness should not be discharged. Bankruptcy courts are required to analyze a debtor’s student loans, and make a determination of nondischargeability of them, on a loan-by-loan basis. There is no authority in this Circuit for discharging only a portion of a particular loan. – Marie vs Citibank

Since you are in New York City I would suggest you contact Jay Fleischman, a bankruptcy attorney, and discuss your situation. It’s a long shot but it’s still worth exploring.

It might be that a move back to Texas would be beneficial in that it may support your claim the loans are simply unsustainable. And a move back would give you the opportunity to rest in a safe place for a bit and recharge for any fight ahead.

Allowing yourself to remain in a situation that only tears you down emotionally is not healthy or sustainable.

One crazy idea worth possibly exploring is to move back to Texas, mentally regroup, let the private student loans default, the lender may sue you but in Texas since these are private student loans they apepar to not be able to garnish your wages. Texas “do[es] not allow wage garnishment at all except for debts related to taxes, child support, federally guaranteed student loans, and court-ordered fines or restitution.” – Source. As time moved on you could later attempt to settle on the defaulted student loans if you had the financial capacity to do so.

I agree that is kind of a radical approach. You’d need to contact a Texas attorney and confirm that your wages could not be attached for the private student loans before you embarked on such a journey.

Texas and Pennsylvania, for example, do not allow wage garnishment for unsecured debts such as private student loans. – Source

Once you got your feet back on the ground in Texas you could explore new employment opportunities in Texas and breath some life back into your law career.

If you view the move back as a rescue mission, rather than a pitty move you can significantly use it to your advantage. If you move back with your tail between your legs and feeling hopeless it may not provide you with the resurrection you deserve.

We need to turn this situation into a success story.

Please post your responses and follow-up messages to me on this in the comments section below.

Big Hug!

Student Loans and Suicide. Im a Lawyer Living in a Hovel in New York With Private Student Loan Debt and Thinking of Becoming an Escort.
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About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode
Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.
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  • Unanimous User 1

    I feel your pain, and I have a much deeper debt hole than the one I am reading about. My private loans are at 149,000 dollars, and my federal loans are roughly 30,000. Since I could not possibly pay my private student loans with a catholic teacher’s salary, the state went after me and garnished 10% of my wages in back pay. Not to mention, I have a huge cloud following me day to day, my credit score is shot. I only have two small credit cards to show I am trying to somehow rehab my credit. I will never be able to buy a house, or start a family. I am in a situation where there is no help out there whatsoever UNLESS the Private Student Loan Bankruptcy Act falls into place this year after two years of no success. The only hope right now is the Student Fairness Act of 2013 that will go into affect in July – which seems to have some options with federal loans, and allowing the chance to shift private loans into federal loans, which in my case is a LONGSHOT. I had no guidance whatsoever when applying for these loans. I never completed any of the paperwork, I only signed them. My grandmother was the cosigner who passed away three years ago, and now the loan is solely thrown on me.
    The only real advice I can give you is to keep searching for answers, and keep fighting this. There has to be some kind of light at the end of the tunnel, and even though this is a debt that is out of reach – still try to find it in yourself to enjoy your life, even if you are in debt the rest of your life. Try to find a place to live with roommates and show them a track record of the rent you’ve paid in previous living situations to prove you pay living expenses on time. Save phone bills or utility bills to show you paid them on time and get a letter from previous landlords to state that you’ve been on time with payments.
    I always make sure my rent is my number 1 option. If you can build a good rapport with roommates, and shared living situations, some places may take that into consideration, and not really count your student loan credit score against you. Hang in there, and just know that other people are in the same boat as you. I’m living day to day, pay check to pay check, and barely get by. And that’s with only the 10% of my income going to the loans I cannot pay back.
    Something has to be done soon – or not only will our economy suffer more, but students who are fresh out of college will soon not be able to buy any houses, mortgages will soon be in a deeper decline than it already is, and only the ones who are lucky enough to land a decent job to repay may have a real shot at some kind of a life beyond college. I just wish I was smarter AND educated more on what I was getting myself into before I went to College. I almost regret backing out of joining the army after high school and having the military pay for my education. But it’s too late to turn back now. You have to do all you can to keep moving forward.

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      I recently published this and hope there is some new information in there to help. http://getoutofdebt.org/51013/the-ultimate-guide-to-dealing-with-student-loans-you-cant-afford

    • J

      Not to be harsh or anything but did you ever think in the first place .. damn maibe i shouldent get so many loans if its going to be hard to repay ??? how in the world do you keep taking out loan after loan .. You guys complain when it is you that put yourself in that bad situation in the first place… wow

  • http://www.facebook.com/allen.botnick Allen Botnick

    I hate the advice given here.  The best thing you can do is emmigate to a country like Canada then file bankruptcy to eliminate the debt.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Z5RQYDJWVPM36JKBAJSL3UF3D4 Roxanne

     I owe almost 200,000 on my federal direct student loan and pray every night and feels like every minute of every day that god will release me from this debt. But……. so here I sit readin this sad story and feeling the same way. God what was I thinking. My life needs a whole makeover. I don’t like my job can’t seem to get anywhere. Promotions are based on who you know and not what you know. Total debt with student loans is about 270,000 and I make 60,000 gross. It’s so weird it’s like waking up one day and realizing I have made a terrible terrible mistake. My saying goes like this, I though I picked up a gardner snake but didn’t realize I had picked up a rattle snake. I have thought about suicide but realize I am to wimpy to do it and probably would hurt people in the process. Actually, I couldn’t do that to my dog. I ask myself everyday why did I take these loans out. More than half is accumulated interest. so here I am sigh…….. Before the judgemental types come on here. I search everyday for a better paying job. Working part-time at a restaurant or department store is not going to help. I have tried room mates. One room mate died, the others were so flakey it ended up costing me more grief and money than it was worth. I have thought about living in a tent but that wouldn’t help with maintaining a job. I would have no where to clean and keep clothing. But I figure if I lived in a tent for 10 years and at out of a soup kitchen I could probably pay back the loans — but somehow I think I would lose my job and kill myself after the first year.  Please world pray for me that some good fortune comes around so I can be released from my debt and then help others to be released from the student loan burden.

    • Michie1418

      I am 24 years old. I graduated 2 years ago. I owe $150,000. NJ Class private student loans. I don’t know what to do with myself at this point. I don’t see a way out. I spend my time stressing and researching options. There isn’t any options. 

      I have also contemplated suicide. A couple of months ago I came really close to it. Collection calls, no income, finding out my Father had an affair, my boyfriend breaking up with me……I went from weighing 120 lbs to 100 lbs.  I decided to go out with my friend to forget my problems at least for a little bit. Believe it or not I am not a frequent drinker if ever and I do not experiment with drugs. However, I got drunk out of my mind. I still cannot remember when or how I made the decision to take my car out for a ride (after I got home from my outing.) I remember crying hysterically while driving. It was 3 am, I ran a stop sign not caring. I was driving a Scion tC when an SUV crashed in between my driver’s door and back end. My car flipped at least 3 times and I am still alive. While the car was flipping all I could think about was my 17 year old Sister, my 7 year old Brother, my Mother and my dog. My Mother cosigned for my loans by the way. My exact thought while rolling in the car was “I change my mind. I cannot die. God don’t let me die….my Family.” Now, I have a  year left of license suspension. I have a temporary job paying $20 an hour. I have no idea how I am going to get to work every morning. I’ve tried making extra money selling things at fairs and applying for part time jobs.  Life sucks. The stress is eating me up every day.  I guess I am happy I survived the car accident though. Suicide is not an option.  I couldn’t leave my Family. They are the reason I stick around this insignificant life. 

      It just isn’t fair that we are treated as delinquents. Why doesn’t the government hear our cries?

      I hope for some light in your life. I hope this burden ends for us some day.

      • Michie1418

        Another thing, I am thinking about getting life insurance. I recommend anyone who had their parents cosign to do so.

        $150,000 on student loans that I am trying to keep from falling into default. Oh, forgot to tell. I have defaulted on $25,000. $16,500 is the principal.  I haven’t been able to begin my payment plan on the defaulted loan. I am in process of settling my credit cards. I’m falling behind on my surcharges also because I am trying to keep the $150,000 from falling into default status.

        This just isn’t life.

        I know having a DUI is my fault.  I was emotional and drunk. Pretending to be strong for (my Family) such a long time until I lost my mind.  How can a person live with regular life issues, little income, and this kind of debt?

      • Unanimous User 1

        I can totally relate. NJ Class Loans ruined my life :(

  • cristine

    Undue hardships would only be granted if there is substantial proof that the debtor cannot overcome the hardship over the life of the loan. If it is a 100K loan, the time to pay off will be considered and the burden will be on the debtor to prove they cannot improve their situation. It rarely succeeds, and generally only in the case of disability that will continue. The bankruptcy protections which are afforded to every OTHER TYPE OF LOAN need to be returned to student loans. It is truly a very immoral and sick country that allows someone to rack up tens of thousands in gambling debt to walk away but education debt will follow you into the grave but before you get there it will take take from you disability, social security, tax returns, anything without a court order. Maybe wage garnishment can be avoided, but liens, etc. cannot.

    • blakade

      There are way to fix the problem with private student loans.  Part of the problem is a lack of Lawyers with integrity, guts, and vision to figure it out.  The major problem is the biased judges shamelessly ruling in favor of student loan creditors.  Just read some of the court opinions and you will see.  The Brunner Test is complete ridiculousness, “certainty of hopelessness,” are you serious?  This judicial law making has got to stop.  There are a couple of holes in the statues.  There are not enough cases where people actually attacked the interpretation of statues of 11 USC § 523.  Everybody who takes on these cases only takes the path of least resistance which is arguing “undue hardship.”  There are plenty of other arguments to make, but it takes research, time and effort.  Many attorneys are not willing to put this kind of effort into a case, because of greed.  They want money, and someone at their wits end who doesn’t have the kind of money to fund a case with this level of work and research.  My suggestion to all the recent law graduates is to flood the courts with adversarial proceedings and civil suits against these lenders.  This in turn will open the eyes of Congress on the issue.  Although difficult, this is a new opportunity to make some money in a niche that has potential.  One Trillion in outstanding student loans and so many people who have them.  Use the dockets find related case, start the battle.  This student loan mess is a racket.  The cost of school has inflated so much its not even worth it to going to school and it all comes back to Lobbyist with interest in taking advantage of the American public.  When you get rid of the bankruptcy protections, tuitions inflate, and creditors have unlimited power.  Having peoples parents co-sign loans and ruining families when their children default.  Having clauses when in death the loan still exist so if their child dies they are still responsible for the loan.  People killing themselves, becoming homeless, and resorting to unscrupulous actives due to these “slave loans.”  Its complete evil and the people responsible for orchestrating this mess will one day face judgment for these actions.

  • Denise Smith

    Thanks for the suggestion MIchael!

    • Killmenow

      I’m in the same boat. I’m in default on my loan 30K, but now owe only 40K because I consolidated for a low interest rate so I’m getting screwed as well but just with a little grease, but it still hurts. and they just started garnishing my check. The twinkle is gone from my eyes and I feel as if a brick is also in my stomach rumbling ALL THE TIME. I’m turning to alcohol and just woke up somewhere I don’t remember falling asleep. It felt SOOO good to forget for a minute. I hope I don’t end up on skid row because I’m drinking in the mornings now. I just woke up and within 2 minutes I feel this oppressive load on my shoulders and the will not to live. I feel dread and feel that working is getting me nowhere. Now I am no longer middle class and I don’t know how I will start a family or get out of this, get a house, get a car. My back is really against the wall right now and I never thought this would be the America I grew up in. This CAN’T be my country. IT CAN’T. IT JUST CAN’T BE.

      I’m feeling better now though as I just took my daily tranquilizers that the doctor gave me to calm down so I can at least function at work. I can’t stop the tranquilizers or I will have a grand mal seizure, but at least I can function a little. The anti-depressants are helping as well. So not I’m an emotionless zombie because I wanted a better life for myself. I have NO OTHER DEBT. NONE. ZILCH. I don’t even use credit cards, I just wanted an education.

      I want to die. I see myself wilting away each day and sometimes i’m walking home from work and I forget my way home because my head feels like it’s gonna explode.

      I really hope the doctor gives me more tranqulizers. My tolerance is going up and I’m still feeling anxious. I hope I’ll be able to function at work today and the next and the next until I just pay them their interest and chip away $12 from my principal monthly until it’s done. I’ll be retired by then and hope I won’t be homeless.

    • Killmenow

      I’m in the same boat. I’m in default on my loan 30K, but now owe only 40K because I consolidated for a low interest rate so I’m getting screwed as well but just with a little grease, but it still hurts. and they just started garnishing my check. The twinkle is gone from my eyes and I feel as if a brick is also in my stomach rumbling ALL THE TIME. I’m turning to alcohol and just woke up somewhere I don’t remember falling asleep. It felt SOOO good to forget for a minute. I hope I don’t end up on skid row because I’m drinking in the mornings now. I just woke up and within 2 minutes I feel this oppressive load on my shoulders and the will not to live. I feel dread and feel that working is getting me nowhere. Now I am no longer middle class and I don’t know how I will start a family or get out of this, get a house, get a car. My back is really against the wall right now and I never thought this would be the America I grew up in. This CAN’T be my country. IT CAN’T. IT JUST CAN’T BE.

      I’m feeling better now though as I just took my daily tranquilizers that the doctor gave me to calm down so I can at least function at work. I can’t stop the tranquilizers or I will have a grand mal seizure, but at least I can function a little. The anti-depressants are helping as well. So not I’m an emotionless zombie because I wanted a better life for myself. I have NO OTHER DEBT. NONE. ZILCH. I don’t even use credit cards, I just wanted an education.

      I want to die. I see myself wilting away each day and sometimes i’m walking home from work and I forget my way home because my head feels like it’s gonna explode.

      I really hope the doctor gives me more tranqulizers. My tolerance is going up and I’m still feeling anxious. I hope I’ll be able to function at work today and the next and the next until I just pay them their interest and chip away $12 from my principal monthly until it’s done. I’ll be retired by then and hope I won’t be homeless.

      • Killmenow

        I also want to say I grew up believing in GOD and now I wake up and curse him. I curse him throughout the day. They say he can move mountains, but I don’t even want that. Can’t he just reduce my loan to what it was before w/no interest. That can’t be hard for Him if he’s moving mountains. Why didn’t he warn me against this? Why did it have to end up like this? I’m not a bad guy. I’m actually a pretty good guy. Is this what good guys get?

        I don’t want to take tranquilizers and drink but if I don’t, I feel
        RAGE. Like in that movie, 28 Days Later, I feel as if I have been
        infected with RAGE and that is what enables me to function in society as a normal person, or I walk around sober and people ask me what’s wrong with my face? THESE ARE MY CHOICES!!!!!!!!!!

        I must say being the person I am I can’t take this sitting down, besides my ass is raw and hurts from the SallieMae reaming. Right now I’m looking to exploit anybody or anything to pay this off. I may have to start a porn website, have people sign up up with their credit cards and make some clause in there that says they can’t cancel for a year just so I can get the money. Why do I have to be the honest one here with morals and values? Look where being nice got me.  I’ll probably  go to hell for the cursing and the porn site and duping people, but I’m already in HELL. So it’s HELL OR HELL? At least if I pay it off this way, I won’t be in HELL for my time here on earth. HELP ME PLEASE!

      • pleaseDont

        Find an inexpensive school to attend. In my experience they can’t ask you to pay back your loans while you are a full time student. I understand you are working and it might be tough, but then life is already tough now, you might as well do something to focus your mind.

        I’m attending a school online called WGU (Western Governor’s University), they are awesome and have some really good programs. It’s only 3k/semester, which is 6 months. So, it’s 6k a year. I don’t know what your loans look like, but I hope this is something that can help you.

        It’s a tight spot, but don’t let them take control of your life. You are still in control — know this. 

      • Killmenow

        when they start garnishing your check, you”ll see whose in control. KNOW THIS!  My day is continuing and I’m being nasty at work and I don’t want to be. People are talking to me and I only hear half of what they say. When will this feeling end? NEVER OR if I give them what I can’t repay, so  I guess the answer is NEVER. 

        I find myself doing crazy things; like walking down the street with tears in my eyes. I stabbed myself with a pen last night in a drunken stupor to really see if this was a dream. This CAN’T be my life. I only wanted an education.  The FUCKING dregs of society that live around me because I can’t afford to live anywhere else ALL HAVE MORE THAN ME. SALLIEMAE FUCK YOU! FUCK YOU! FUCK YOU! FUCK YOU! FUCK YOU! FUCK YOU! FUCKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK YOU!

      • Killmenow

        FUCK YOU! FUCKKKKKKKKKKKKKK YOU! FUCKKKK! KILL ME NOW! FUCK MY LIFE!

        I can’t wait for a year from now when I really fucking spiral into madness.

      • Michie1418

        I feel your pain. I am in the same situation. I hope you are doing better since your posted this.

  • Denise Smith

    This is a sad but unfortunately not a unique story.  Far too many of us feel the unreasonable and unbearable weight of excessive student debt. 

    I would like to extend an invitation to all who struggle with student debt and are concerned about the long term impact of carrying this debt…

    With virtually no discussion about the number of older Americans carrying student debt or the impact of still owing this debt, the true picture of the student debt crisis has yet to be painted.

    The few references made are usually qualified with statements such as “while this may be the exception”.
    Calling this crisis “the exception” only serves to marginalize us and allows people to discount the issue and us as insignificant. I don’t know about you, but how much I owe, how long I have owed it and carrying it until I die is far from insignificant.
    (We are a long-term case study for this issue.  We provide a glimpse of whats ahead if changes are not made and soon!)

    Older Americans have already faced many of the same struggles associated with youth, struggles our younger student counterparts now face, or soon will.  However by virtue of the fact that we have lived longer we have also had the opportunity to face more of life’s financial challenges; divorce, bankruptcy, providing for our children, single parenting, caring for aging parents and health issues.

    It also means there have been more years for our student loan interest be capitalized increasing our debt load to unreasonable and unbearable amounts.  For many these amounts are now double, triple or quadruple our original loans.

    At an age when we should be planning to pay off our homes, preparing for retirement and helping our children through college we are instead burdened with the knowledge that if things do not change NOW, we will likely live out our “golden years” impoverished.

    There are no consumer protections when it comes to student loans. They can not be discharged in bankruptcy.  Wages can be garnished.  Social Security can be garnished.  Property can be liened.

    Add to these challenges the “ism” that no one seems to be aware of until they experience it for themselves…ageism.
    While ageism has always existed, it is even more prevalent in our current economy (the one we will likely live out our days in) and the fierce competition for todays jobs only magnifies this. 

    Inflated education costs, capitalized interest, fewer years remaining to pay, no consumer protections, lack of well paying jobs and greater competition for those jobs all spell trouble for older Americans carrying student debt.

    Given that mainstream media is largely where the average American obtains the information from which they form their opinions, it only makes sense to “educate” the average American via that media.
    To that end, we are conducting a survey to gather this missing data.  The goal is to:

      1. Obtain the data that the media has neglected to look for. While it cannot account for everyone, it’s a start and should begin to paint a more accurate picture.
      2. Find as many ways as possible to convey this data to reach mainstream America; local & national news, AARP and any other available venues that are not “preaching to the choir”.
      3. Share this data with policy makers.
    We need your help to accomplish this!  Please start by completing our anonymous survey.  Plan on 10-15 minutes.

    Please take our survey at:  
    http://www.surveybuilder.com/s/JyaJsuHOAAA?source_id=3&source_type=web

    We also invite you to visit us at
    http://www.agingwithstudentdebt.org/
    and join our FB group at
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/aging.with.student.debt/?notif_t=group_activity. 
    Here you will find peer support and others who are taking action to turn around this crisis.

    There is another FB group I strongly encourage you to join as well, it is Forgive Student Loan Debt:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/forgivestudentloandebt/?notif_t=group_activity

    • http://www.consumerrecoverynetwork.com/ Michael

      Fantastic comment Denise.
      Not only is the student loan debt crisis not going away, it is likely to get worse.
      I encourage you to reach out to the credit counseling associations if you have not already. They either have now, or could tweak their systems to develop and have, a demographic/generational data base of people struggling under the weight of student loan debts. They would be natural participants in this effort given their stated purpose of assisting and educating consumers about debt.
      The three CCA associations are the ACCPRO, AICCCA, and the NFCC.

       

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      I am seeing more people that are getting their social security benefits garnished for student loan payments. I would expect to see that grow.

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      I am seeing more people that are getting their social security benefits garnished for student loan payments. I would expect to see that grow.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MTMGPY4KE2YRGTKSJA2LSWXGSE what up

    In situations like this you just figure out what you can and cant do.  Then go do it.  Anything is better than killing yourself, they cant come kill you, they’re the ones who gave you the loans knowing there was risk involved.  Move to where you can work and live without them taking your money, and tell them to fuck off.  Then dont worry about it anymore.  They cant take from you what you dont have.

  • S. Swan Thompson

    Excuse me for butting in here, but I feel compelled to do so.  One of my oldest friends, a talented artist I’ve known for 30 years, committed suicide on June 20, 2011.  At his memorial service on June 26, we (being his shellshocked friends) traded stories about his life and experiences with him, and remembered him fondly. Then I went to my therapist the following day to deal with the pain & anger because this brilliant, gifted man threw away the rest of his life due to a temporary set of circumstances.  Please tell the person who wrote the post about committing suicide to remember that WE’RE ONLY TALKING ABOUT MONEY, for God’s sake.  Just money.  Not worth dying over.

  • S. Swan Thompson

    Excuse me for butting in here, but I feel compelled to do so.  One of my oldest friends, a talented artist I’ve known for 30 years, committed suicide on June 20, 2011.  At his memorial service on June 26, we (being his shellshocked friends) traded stories about his life and experiences with him, and remembered him fondly. Then I went to my therapist the following day to deal with the pain & anger because this brilliant, gifted man threw away the rest of his life due to a temporary set of circumstances.  Please tell the person who wrote the post about committing suicide to remember that WE’RE ONLY TALKING ABOUT MONEY, for God’s sake.  Just money.  Not worth dying over. 

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_Z5RQYDJWVPM36JKBAJSL3UF3D4 Roxanne

      Thx for your words of encouragment. 

  • Susan B

    I feel really bad for the person who wrote this letter.  Suicide and becoming an escort are not the solution the problem. IBR is not an option on defaulted loans.  Proving undue hardship in bankruptcy is extremely difficult, so it’s not something that I would count on.  Perhaps, she could find a way to rehab her student loans.  I think that this woman should continue to seek higher paying employment. Or consider keeping her job and doing some sort of freelance work which will generate additional income.  She should also see everything that she does not need and use the proceeds to pay down her student loans.

  • Susan B

    I feel really bad for the person who wrote this letter.  Suicide and becoming an escort are not the solution the problem. IBR is not an option on defaulted loans.  Proving undue hardship in bankruptcy is extremely difficult, so it’s not something that I would count on.  Perhaps, she could find a way to rehab her student loans.  I think that this woman should continue to seek higher paying employment. Or consider keeping her job and doing some sort of freelance work which will generate additional income.  She should also see everything that she does not need and use the proceeds to pay down her student loans. 

  • MJ

    Another option is to leave the country. Do you have friends or family abroad?

  • MJ

    Another option is to leave the country. Do you have friends or family abroad?

  • no credit check student loans

    This is cool! And so interested! Are u have more
    posts like this? Please tell me, thanks

  • Tsigili

    P.S. You mentioned that your loans are with Citibank – you probably already know this, but CitiBank, CitiMortage, CitiWhatever – they’re all EVIL. I hope you can get free of them. On the upside, Citi has been the subject of all kinds of class action suits recently! I know I feel better just knowing that. Good luck, kiddo!

  • Tsigili

    P.S. You mentioned that your loans are with Citibank – you probably already know this, but CitiBank, CitiMortage, CitiWhatever – they’re all EVIL. I hope you can get free of them. On the upside, Citi has been the subject of all kinds of class action suits recently! I know I feel better just knowing that. Good luck, kiddo!

  • Tsigili

    I took out a student loan to help my daughter get through school, not knowing that the illness I’d just developed would turn out to be incurable. After years of unsuccessfully fighting to get better & go back to work, I finally called the student loan people, who at first only wanted to know how much of my disability benefits they could get. Then they couldn’t believe I was getting so little. Finally, they agreed that they COULD forgive loans in such circumstances. It took another year for them to do so. I finally received a letter confirming that they had decided to forgive my loan, & saying that I’d receive finalization papers. Three months later, a collection agent was calling & threatening me. Turns out the paperwork to forgive my loan had been misplaced somewhere. I called my Senator & sent copies of everything to his office. His people put a stop to it in just a few weeks! It shows as paid on my credit report – which is weird, but I’m happy with it. Of course, this isn’t the same as your situation, but I understand your feeling of being overwhelmed. The student loan collectors excel at projecting that, eh?

    Re: employment. Don’t forget you can always do pro bono work. I worked in corporate law for 18 years (back in my healthy days), as a legal secretary and paralegal. I often heard managing partners say, “A good pro bono history outweighs a personal financial record any day.” Wherever you end up, do pro bono work and be proud. It’s not easy to become an attorney.

  • Tsigili

    I took out a student loan to help my daughter get through school, not knowing that the illness I’d just developed would turn out to be incurable. After years of unsuccessfully fighting to get better & go back to work, I finally called the student loan people, who at first only wanted to know how much of my disability benefits they could get. Then they couldn’t believe I was getting so little. Finally, they agreed that they COULD forgive loans in such circumstances. It took another year for them to do so. I finally received a letter confirming that they had decided to forgive my loan, & saying that I’d receive finalization papers. Three months later, a collection agent was calling & threatening me. Turns out the paperwork to forgive my loan had been misplaced somewhere. I called my Senator & sent copies of everything to his office. His people put a stop to it in just a few weeks! It shows as paid on my credit report – which is weird, but I’m happy with it. Of course, this isn’t the same as your situation, but I understand your feeling of being overwhelmed. The student loan collectors excel at projecting that, eh?

    Re: employment. Don’t forget you can always do pro bono work. I worked in corporate law for 18 years (back in my healthy days), as a legal secretary and paralegal. I often heard managing partners say, “A good pro bono history outweighs a personal financial record any day.” Wherever you end up, do pro bono work and be proud. It’s not easy to become an attorney.

  • James

    Some other things you could consider:

    Try renting a storage and renting a room. I’m thinking you may have a lot of stuff. So why not consider using a storage and renting a room? I’m sure you have a network of friends that may know of a trustworthy place to rent a room instead of finding your own place. Live like this for a year or so until you got your financial situation under control and building your credit again.

    Then again living at home, you have no rent. Downside is that your parents become your roommates.

    Don’t risk yourself doing the escort gig. You worked too hard to get where you are to become an escort girl.

    Best of luck

  • James

    Some other things you could consider:

    Try renting a storage and renting a room. I’m thinking you may have a lot of stuff. So why not consider using a storage and renting a room? I’m sure you have a network of friends that may know of a trustworthy place to rent a room instead of finding your own place. Live like this for a year or so until you got your financial situation under control and building your credit again.

    Then again living at home, you have no rent. Downside is that your parents become your roommates.

    Don’t risk yourself doing the escort gig. You worked too hard to get where you are to become an escort girl.

    Best of luck

  • Sduran165

    Are you hot?

  • Sduran165

    Are you hot?

    • Ropesthecowboy

      I’m guessing no, as she doesn’t believe there is much market in escorting for someone who looks like her.

  • Hollis

    Whoa! I feel a great deal of compassion for this hard-working woman who has endured such rotten luck. (Been there!) One missing piece of information: Is she admitted to the Bar in the State of New York? If so, her employment possibilities as an attorney might be more limited in Texas. Does she really want to live in New York? If so, there are easier ways to beef up her income than escort services.

    How about a part-time sales job? Evenings and weekends? Saturday is retail’s busiest day, and not likely to conflict with her regular 9-to-5 gig. Check in with the major department stores. How about tutoring other students? Kaplan, among others, hires tutors and class instructors for bar exams and other exams (SAT, GMAT, etc.) Or visit local high schools and inquire in the prinipals’s office.

    Waitressing on the weekend? Check New York magazine or Time Out New York for restaurant openings; newcomers may not have an entrenched staff already lined up. Summer’s coming up, with oodles of street fairs. Maybe some of the booths need sales help? Since many of the exhibitors are regulars at all the major fairs, why not walk the first one of the season and check in with the largest booths?

    Finally, I suggest Debtors Anonymous, Underearners Anonymous, and SMART Recovery meetings to break up some of the sadness and isolation. She may not realize it, but her way of thinking MAY be contributing to her lack of job success and her money issues. Nothing to lose- if she doesn’t like it, she can just walk out. And they’re free. I also hope she’s networking her local Bar Associations – both city and state. If she can’t afford meeting fees, perhaps she can offer to “man” the registration desk or trade some other service in exchange for free attendance.

    I hope this helps. She’s not the only one out there facing job and money woes. I hope and pray she’ll get a break (or make a break!) to enjoy a better life in the near future.

    BTW a worker who takes home $3600 an month and pays $1200 in rent has $2400 left over for discretionary expenses. It seems unlikely that you’ll starve to death on $2400 a month, even in New York. (That’s where I live, so I’m not guessing.) Its not what your skills and training are worth, but it’s not extreme poverty either. Every day, make a mental list of all the things you have to be grateful about. It does help!

  • Hollis

    Whoa! I feel a great deal of compassion for this hard-working woman who has endured such rotten luck. (Been there!) One missing piece of information: Is she admitted to the Bar in the State of New York? If so, her employment possibilities as an attorney might be more limited in Texas. Does she really want to live in New York? If so, there are easier ways to beef up her income than escort services.

    How about a part-time sales job? Evenings and weekends? Saturday is retail’s busiest day, and not likely to conflict with her regular 9-to-5 gig. Check in with the major department stores. How about tutoring other students? Kaplan, among others, hires tutors and class instructors for bar exams and other exams (SAT, GMAT, etc.) Or visit local high schools and inquire in the prinipals’s office.

    Waitressing on the weekend? Check New York magazine or Time Out New York for restaurant openings; newcomers may not have an entrenched staff already lined up. Summer’s coming up, with oodles of street fairs. Maybe some of the booths need sales help? Since many of the exhibitors are regulars at all the major fairs, why not walk the first one of the season and check in with the largest booths?

    Finally, I suggest Debtors Anonymous, Underearners Anonymous, and SMART Recovery meetings to break up some of the sadness and isolation. She may not realize it, but her way of thinking MAY be contributing to her lack of job success and her money issues. Nothing to lose- if she doesn’t like it, she can just walk out. And they’re free. I also hope she’s networking her local Bar Associations – both city and state. If she can’t afford meeting fees, perhaps she can offer to “man” the registration desk or trade some other service in exchange for free attendance.

    I hope this helps. She’s not the only one out there facing job and money woes. I hope and pray she’ll get a break (or make a break!) to enjoy a better life in the near future.

    BTW a worker who takes home $3600 an month and pays $1200 in rent has $2400 left over for discretionary expenses. It seems unlikely that you’ll starve to death on $2400 a month, even in New York. (That’s where I live, so I’m not guessing.) Its not what your skills and training are worth, but it’s not extreme poverty either. Every day, make a mental list of all the things you have to be grateful about. It does help!

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