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Home > Ask The Get Out of Debt Experts > What happens to your U.S. debt if you were to move to another country? – Jazz

What happens to your U.S. debt if you were to move to another country? – Jazz

I’m am 30 years old, and became very ill back in 2008, right during my senior year in college. Ended up defaulting on my student loans and credit cards because I was in the hospital for so long. However, I am also engaged to marry a New Zealand citizen, and was wondering if I were to move to NZ, what would happen to my debt here in the states? Will it follow me there? I can file for bankruptcy for the cc debt (30k), but my student loan debt is just so extremely overwhelming I can’t even contemplate how I’m going to afford paying it off. I currently get a small disability check, and I’m paying off one loan my mom co-signed for, but I still have over $120k left to pay off. HELP!!

What happens to your U.S. debt if you were to move to another country? - Jazz by

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  • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

    In the long run it would be better to deal with the debt in the U.S. than worry about it.

    Bankruptcy is a valid approach for the consumer debt. 

    Are you permanently disabled?

    Are these private or government student loans?

    • Jade V

      I would like to stay in the U.S., but my fiance would rather have us live in his home country, New Zealand. From the progress I’ve made since my illness flared-up, it seems that I am permanently disabled, since there really hasn’t been a significant amount of improvement. I actually sent another question concerning my disability and debt, and a man named Michael replied that in some instances, student loans may be waived if someone is permanently disabled – is this true? 

      My student loans are with Sallie Mae, which I believe is private. 

      And one more question that my fiance actually brought up… If I were to file for bankruptcy, is there a restriction on me traveling overseas shortly after filing? 

      Thanks so much for all your help!!! You don’t know how much it means to me to talk to someone about how to resolve my financial issues without having to leave my house. 

    • Jade V

      I would like to stay in the U.S., but my fiance would rather have us live in his home country, New Zealand. From the progress I’ve made since my illness flared-up, it seems that I am permanently disabled, since there really hasn’t been a significant amount of improvement. I actually sent another question concerning my disability and debt, and a man named Michael replied that in some instances, student loans may be waived if someone is permanently disabled – is this true? 

      My student loans are with Sallie Mae, which I believe is private. 

      And one more question that my fiance actually brought up… If I were to file for bankruptcy, is there a restriction on me traveling overseas shortly after filing? 

      Thanks so much for all your help!!! You don’t know how much it means to me to talk to someone about how to resolve my financial issues without having to leave my house. 

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        There is no restriction in travel after bankruptcy.

        If you are permanently disabled there is a process for loan forgiveness. Here are details on the program, click here.

        To qualify for this discharge, a physician must certify that the borrower is totally and permanently disabled according to the definition above. The borrower must submit the application to the loan holder within 90 days of the date the physician certifies the application. No payments are due on the loan while the borrower’s eligibility for discharge is being reviewed. If a borrower receives a FFEL, Perkins, or Direct Loan program loan or a TEACH Grant prior to the date the physician signed the application (the Physician Signature Date) and a disbursement of that loan or grant is made on or after the Physician Signature Date and before the date the U.S. Department of Education (the Department) grants discharge, the loan holder must suspend processing of the borrower’s loan discharge request until the borrower ensures that the full amount of the disbursement has been returned to the loan holder or to the Department, as applicable.

  • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

    In the long run it would be better to deal with the debt in the U.S. than worry about it.

    Bankruptcy is a valid approach for the consumer debt. 

    Are you permanently disabled?

    Are these private or government student loans?

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