Ask The Get Out of Debt Experts Debt Relief Industry Debt Settlement

Why Are You Against Debt Settlement? – Nick

“Dear Steve,

Why do you insinuate to people that they live in fear and always be cautious to people contacting them to provide them a service. Where are your statistics on the advise you give.

Debt settlement is real and constantly I see people putting there trust into you to make there decisions for them and I have never seen you acknowledge that the process exhists or works.

Your articles are always one sided and do not justify anything you right negative in regards to the debt settlement process. The people I talk to are in desperate need of debt relief and for you to steer them in another direction based on your personal opinions is proposterous.

I cannot believe people listen to the nonsense you feed them. If anyone wants realistic advise on the debt settlement process you can respond to this email and Ill be more than happy to assist you.

Nick”

Dear Nick,

Making any decision clouded by fear can easily lead to decisions that may latter be regretted. The decisions may be more impulsively rooted rather than clearly and logical thought out. But then on top of that we have the real issues of hyperbolic discounting which can lead to the wrong decision as well.

But Don’t Believe Me. Believe the Scientists.

Or how about what Gregory Berns, M.D., Ph.D., who directs the Center for Neuropolicy at Emory University, has to say on this topic.

Ultimately, no good can come from this type of decision-making. Fear prompts retreat. It is the antipode to progress. Just when we need new ideas most, everyone is seized up in fear, trying to prevent losing what we have left.

Some people showed strong fear conditioning, and their brains displayed it through early and strong deployment of neural resources to deal with the impending shock. Most of this activity appeared in the parts of the brain devoted to processing pain. That makes sense, but the activity rose well in advance of receiving the shock. All of this worrying took energy. It means that these extreme responders had less available neural processing power to deal with other tasks.

Why is this important? The reason has to do with the “endowment effect,” the innate tendency to value things you own more highly than everyone else does. A recent brain imaging study showed that the same parts of the brain we observed in our experiment are also active when people must sell something they are attached to. The cause and effect have not been fully sorted out, but the implication is that when our brains sense pain, or anticipate loss, we tend to hold onto what we have. When everyone does this at once, the result is a downward economic spiral.

The most concrete thing that neuroscience tells us is that when the fear system of the brain is active, exploratory activity and risk-taking are turned off. The first order of business, then, is to neutralize that system. – Source

What I suggest is that people in fear act cautiously and evaluate their options before making a decision. I don’t understand how you can find fault for that? After all, you do want your clients to make the right decision for them, don’t you?

If you look at my online debt calculator you will see that settlement is included as an option. See the How to Get Out of Debt Calculator.

And there have been posts where I have suggested settlement.

But debt settlement or any specific debt relief tool is never going to be appropriate in every situation. The goal of the debt relief specialist should be to not sell the widget on hand but direct a consumer in trouble to make the best decision for them in their situation and help the consumer get the help they need.

I’m interested, what is you criteria is of someone you feel is appropriate for debt settlement? Post your answer in the comments below.

Sincerly,
Steve

You are not alone. I'm here to help. There is no need to suffer in silence. We can get through this. Tomorrow can be better than today. Don't give up.




About the author

Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.

2 Comments

  • Nick, have you researched all the bad debt settlement companies scamming people? No one knows which ones are the honest ones or the ones just looking to make a buck.  I wonder? What company do you work for? Maybe it can be researched to see what your success rate is and see how many complaints you have.

  • Nick, have you researched all the bad debt settlement companies scamming people? No one knows which ones are the honest ones or the ones just looking to make a buck.  I wonder? What company do you work for? Maybe it can be researched to see what your success rate is and see how many complaints you have.

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