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I Got Blacklisted and Banned by Digg and I Can’t Get Out. It’s a Life Sentence.

By on June 4, 2009
I Got Blacklisted and Banned by Digg and I Can’t Get Out. It’s a Life Sentence.

Look, I will be the first one to admit. I f****ed up by installing a social media plugin in 2007, for a short period of time on the GetOutOfDebt.org site. The WordPress plugin would randomly submit a post to Digg and other similar sites to help save me time. I didn’t like the way it worked and felt uncomfortable with the approach so I pulled it.

But apparently I somehow managed to piss off Digg in the process and they blacklisted GetOutOfDebt.org. If you try to Digg a post from GetOutOfDebt.org now you get an error message.

This URL has been widely reported by users for one of the following reasons: being used to spam Digg’s submission process, posting spam content, or posting off-topic content

I don’t mind falling on the sword for a stupid mistake but Digg appears to be unforgiving and one chance and you’re out. That’s the part that doesn’t seem fair.

In 2008 I asked Digg to reconsider the block and to let me back in. Here is what they said:

Thanks for taking the time to contact us at Digg.com regarding your website.

As you know, Digg is a community-driven website – our community has consistently reported the domain to which you refer as spam.

From our FAQ (www.digg.com/faq):

Does Digg differentiate between spam and spamming?
Spam is very subjective. Many times, the spammer honestly doesn’t think they are spammers, so we generally leave that up to the Digg community to decide with the report/bury feature. We may delete users who blatantly and consistently submit obvious spam. Additionally, comment spam is against our TOS and will result in an account ban or deletion, depending on the severity. Submission spamming is different because it may be quality content but the submitter is “spamming” every story from their blog/site. While we welcome users to submit their own content, overdoing it often incites the users to mark the user as a spammer, the site as a spam site, and otherwise decent content as blogspam. We recommend considering this before you engage in this activity. Remember, if domains are consistently buried and reported as spam, the site may be banned.

Because unblocking your domain would not be in line with the best interests of the larger Digg community, we will not reverse this decision.

For more information, please see http://digg.com/faq and http://digg.com/tos

Thank you,

—Digg Support

It is now 2009 and I just contacted Digg again to see if I could get back in and here is what I got.

Hi Steve,

After a manual review we have determined that we can’t reverse the decision.

Best,
– Digg Support Team

The part that has me miffed at this point is that I don’t even really know why I got banned by Digg. They won’t tell me. I not even really sure that it was that plugin now.

READ  February 2019 Companies and People Banned from Debt Relief

Does anyone know some upper level person at Digg that could give me specifics on how to get unbanned by Digg or is the lesson that everyone should learn is one strike and you are out for the rest of your life? Be careful and don’t dig a Digg grave you can’t crawl out from.

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About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.

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