Subscribe to our mailing list

X

I Went to College for a Bit and Now They Want Me to Pay. – Noname

By on January 4, 2010
I Went to College for a Bit and Now They Want Me to Pay. – Noname

Noname

“Dear Steve,

I singed a contract with my college to attend a semester tuition was 10 thousand dollars. I paid 3 thousand and stopped going to classes after that.

The college is insisting I pay the remainder 6 thousand dollars, I ignored there request and told them I never attended class. They said since i singed a contract saying I pay the tuition i was obligated to pay the remainder. Now I have collection call me everyday the balance has somehow jumped to 11 thousand dollars…I am 18 and don’t work live with my parents. My parents cannot pay this off..what are my options? I don’t want to involve my parents however i am a depended of them. I cant pay the money off my college wont corporate and help me and the money seems to grow by the day. It feels like i am drowning in a bag I want to go hide but problems doesn’t seem to disappear. Please help.

What are my options with out involving my parents even if i am a dependent. Can i file bankruptcy. I want to do something so this doesn’t hunt me when I am 35…

Noname”

Dear Noname,

You’re screwed on this debt. You will have to pay it. I’ve seen this happen to a lot of people. The only way a college will reduce the amount of your tuition is if you follow their withdrawal and refund policy. If you had notified them by X date that you were dropping out you would have only had to pay a percentage.

This sure sounds like a private student loan and thus can’t be discharged in bankruptcy but you could always go talk to a local bankruptcy attorney and have them review the situation.

And for all of us over 35, it’s not that old.

There is no need to involve your parents. It sounds like you were 18 when you signed the contract to pay for school. You were of legal age to enter a contract on your own. If you were not 18 when you signed the contract, you might have a loophole there.

READ  I Need Student Loan Forgiveness. - Jim

I can appreciate how stressful and overwhelming the situation feels but it is most the fear of not knowing and not having a plan that creates those bad vibes. Once you talk to the local bankruptcy attorney you’ll know if there is the slightest chance of discharging this debt in bankruptcy, if not, looks like you’ll be working hard to pay it off.

morehelp1

Last step, fill out the information below or call us for Priority Assistance.

What problems are you having with your report?

Your first name is required. Your first name is required to be at least 2 characters. Your first name cannot be longer than 50 characters.
Your last name is required. Your last name is required to be at least 2 characters. Your last name cannot be longer than 50 characters.
Your email is required.
Your phone is required. Your 10 digit phone number is required.
Your state is required.
Your age is required. Your age must be greater than 18. Your age must be less than 100.

By clicking on the "Contact Me" button above, you consent, acknowledge, and agree to the following: Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and to receive electronic communications. We take your privacy seriously. That you are providing express "written" consent for Debt.com or appropriate service provider(s) to call you (including through automated means; e.g. autodialing, text and pre-recorded messaging) via telephone, mobile device (including SMS and MMS - charges may apply), even if your telephone number is currently listed on any internal, corporate, state or federal Do-Not-Call list. Consent is not required as a condition to utilize Debt.com services and you are under no obligation to purchase anything.

By clicking on the “Contact me” button above, you consent, acknowledge, and agree to the following: (1)That you are providing express “written” consent for Lexington Law Firm, Debt.com or appropriate service provider(s) to call you (including through automated means; e.g. autodialing, text and pre-recorded messaging) via telephone, mobile device (including SMS and MMS – charges may apply), or dialed manually, at my residential or cellular number, even if your telephone number is currently listed on any internal, corporate, state or federal Do-Not-Call list; and (2)Lexington Law’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use and Debt.com’s Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Consent is not required as a condition to utilize Lexington Law or Debt.com services and you are under no obligation to purchase anything.

About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.

Share a Comment / Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: