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Removing an Outdated Bankruptcy from a Credit Report: Jorge’s Story

By on July 16, 2015
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Have you ever found an error on your credit report? These errors can negatively affect loan applications, how much you can borrow, hiring decisions and more. In Jorge’s case, he had lost an apartment because of a bankruptcy, which can stay on credit reports for up to ten years.

Ten years had passed since Jorge’s bankruptcy and he was ready to apply for a new apartment. To avoid any trouble with his application, he requested his free credit report and checked if the bankruptcy was still there.

But even after ten years, he learned it was still on one of his credit reports. After trying, unsuccessfully, to get the bankruptcy removed, Jorge contacted the Better Business Bureau, which referred him to the CFPB to submit a complaint.

In Jorge’s words, “Within two weeks, everything was finalized . . . [I got] a letter saying it’s gone.” He continued, “Having a good credit score and a clean credit record is always good. No one was going to help me with my problem – and I took charge, by contacting the CFPB.”

We’re glad that we were able to help Jorge get the help he needed, and we want to make sure that you know we’re here for you too. To share your experience or learn more from others, visit us at consumerfinance.gov/yourstory.

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One Comment

  1. BMW4100

    July 17, 2015 at 1:46 pm

    I would love to see CFPB correct the problem of the three credit reporting agency not all following the same set of rules when it comes to how long a negative account can remain on a person credit report. Equifax is the only one of the three credit reporting agencies that keeps dismissed Chapter 13 Bankruptcy and Chapter 7 Bankruptcy’s on the Equifax Credit File, 10 years from the date filed. Trans Union and Experian Credit Reporting Agency’s remove the negative information after 7 years. I agree that 7 years is long enough for anyone to suffer for having to file a Bankruptcy and EQUIFAX should do the same. “I want to see their policy changed and they be forced to come into compliance with Trans Union and Experian.” We need a petition started so it can become a nationwide law that all three credit reporting agency’s be in compliance and with the same set of rules for reporting the good and the bad credit ratings.

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