Latest Posts
Home > Reader Questions > My Mother Went With Legal Helpers Debt Resolution and Got Sued. – Kimberly

My Mother Went With Legal Helpers Debt Resolution and Got Sued. – Kimberly

My mother signed a contract with Legal Helpers Debt Resolution about 6 months ago. She has been making her monthly payments on time (she signed up for the 4 month plan) and has recently been served with a lawsuit by one of the credit card companies. She has received limited communication from LHDR. The most recent letter indicated that now that the up-front fees are paid, they have started to settle the smaller credit card balances.

How can she verify LDHR is doing their job along the way? Should they be communicating more than about once a month?

Kimberly

It’s time to put debt behind you and start dreaming about your life after debt. – Click to Tweet

The Answer

This reader question was submitted for site members to answer.

This is your chance to be a hero and help out this person by providing your feedback and answer to the question. Post your response in the comments section below.

If you have a credit or debt question you’d like to ask just use the online form.


Get Out of Debt Free Hotline
debt settlement helpstudent loan help

About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode
Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.
  • Steve Rhode

    Legal Helpers Debt Resolution has just been sued by the Attorney General of Illinois. You can read the suit here.

  • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

    Legal Helpers Debt Resolution has just been sued by the Attorney General of Illinois. You can read the suit here.

  • Observer

    Mike

    The part of your post with the A B & C is spot on.

    Other parts of your post confuse me.

    You say an attorney knows best, but then say feel free to ask for a different analyst or manager. Who works on this stuff at legal helpers, an attorney, an analyst or a manager? If an attorney knows best, should not your comment be “feel free to request a different attorney”?

    Can you see where your post would leave someone confused?

    Mike, why should your family member being a client of LHDR be weighed? Who are you? What is it about your family that is so impressive as to be a testament to the level of operation at legal helpers?

  • Observer

    Nick,

    I responded to a comment of yours in a different LHDR post a moment ago, then I came upon this one.

    You, Sir Nick, are not doing Kim any favors by minimizing the lawsuit. You come across intelligent enough, which is why I assume you are aware that lawsuits turn into judgments which lead to garnishment, levy and liens in order to collect on said judgments. That is most certainly a big deal.

    You failed to point out to Kim that it is quite likely her mothers participation with LHDR is what led to the suit. Lets see:

    LHDR payments are paid up front, having paid them, only now are they starting to settle the small accounts.

    The account being sued on could have been avoided by settling it earlier, but that strategy never had a chance because LHDR fees were more important than Kim’s mom’s success. Marketing affiliates for LHDR such as yourself also place a higher importance on getting paid their commissions than on their victi…. ummmm…. customers success.

    The suit against Kim’s mom was likely brought about by LHDR sending in a limited POA in the first place.

    Why do you suggest not spending too much time or money on an attorney for court? Is Legal Debt Helpers not supported by attorneys? Is that not the assumption Kim’s mom had when she enrolled? Does not the name “Legal Debt Helpers” imply legal support? You mean she does not have access to an attorney?

    Kim – What state is your mom in? You/She may indeed want to speak with an attorney. Not for the credit card suit, but to represent you in a claim against LHDR.

    By the way, your car analogy is stupid and your reference to the banks being bailed out in order to attach an emotional aspect to a consumers hardship is equally stupid.

  • Mike

    The whole process of negotiating consumer debt is for some reason not really grasped by many.
    An attorney knows the laws governing a certain issue best out of any of us. With credit card debts, the first few months are tough for a few reasons. A) There is the “grace” period a consumer has (30, 60, 90 days etc.) So if this is the first few months, there really can’t be any updates because the debt hasn’t even been moved to a loss mitigation dept. where the real action can happen. B) Each creditor has different protocol for their consumers late payments, especially with the variance is amount. C) Do you really think that you are one of only a few hundred people these companies have on file and on their desks at this moment? (Try millions)
    So hang in there, keep great notes, make sure whoever is assisting you is competent and if not feel free to ask for a different analyst, manager etc.
    PS
    My family member is a client of this same company, that should speak volumes. Also after the FTC laws have thus been passed, they are still in business. Again, another testament to the level they operate on.
    Be Well.

  • Mike

    The whole process of negotiating consumer debt is for some reason not really grasped by many.
    An attorney knows the laws governing a certain issue best out of any of us. With credit card debts, the first few months are tough for a few reasons. A) There is the “grace” period a consumer has (30, 60, 90 days etc.) So if this is the first few months, there really can’t be any updates because the debt hasn’t even been moved to a loss mitigation dept. where the real action can happen. B) Each creditor has different protocol for their consumers late payments, especially with the variance is amount. C) Do you really think that you are one of only a few hundred people these companies have on file and on their desks at this moment? (Try millions)
    So hang in there, keep great notes, make sure whoever is assisting you is competent and if not feel free to ask for a different analyst, manager etc.
    PS
    My family member is a client of this same company, that should speak volumes. Also after the FTC laws have thus been passed, they are still in business. Again, another testament to the level they operate on.
    Be Well.

    • Observer

      Mike

      The part of your post with the A B & C is spot on.

      Other parts of your post confuse me.

      You say an attorney knows best, but then say feel free to ask for a different analyst or manager. Who works on this stuff at legal helpers, an attorney, an analyst or a manager? If an attorney knows best, should not your comment be “feel free to request a different attorney”?

      Can you see where your post would leave someone confused?

      Mike, why should your family member being a client of LHDR be weighed? Who are you? What is it about your family that is so impressive as to be a testament to the level of operation at legal helpers?

  • Nick V.

    Kim, First, If your Mom doesn’t have funds necessary to settle with her creditors, then LHDR cannot settle with them. LHDR works on a lump payment, or structured settlement program.

    Second, I wouldn’t worry about the summons too much. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not a good thing that she’s being sued, however It’s not as bad as you think. Even a judgement can still be negotiated. Court is NOT the endgame.

    I wouldn’t recommend spending too much time or money on an attorney for court. Why?

    Your Mom is legally obligated to pay her creditors. She signed a contract to perform. It’s that simple. Going to court is a waste because they’re simply going to find in favor of the creditor.
    However, with that said, LHDR still has the ability to negotiate with your creditor, even if there is a judgement, and has been very successful in the past at doing so.

    I understand that it’s a very uncomfortable situation, but (and I say this very sincerely), try to be as business minded as possible. Don’t let the creditors scare you, or play with your emotions. Stay the course. Follow the program. Remember, the program lasts for many months. It’s not a 6 month program. When you buy a car, you’re not just buying the tires. You’re buying the complete car. Similarly, you’ve got to be prepared to run the complete program to experience the effects of paying off your creditors.

    Remember: Your creditor probably got bail out funds from the government already. You didn’t. This means they were financially insolvent well before you were. I wish you luck in your endeavorer.

  • Nick V.

    Kim, First, If your Mom doesn’t have funds necessary to settle with her creditors, then LHDR cannot settle with them. LHDR works on a lump payment, or structured settlement program.

    Second, I wouldn’t worry about the summons too much. Don’t get me wrong. It’s not a good thing that she’s being sued, however It’s not as bad as you think. Even a judgement can still be negotiated. Court is NOT the endgame.

    I wouldn’t recommend spending too much time or money on an attorney for court. Why?

    Your Mom is legally obligated to pay her creditors. She signed a contract to perform. It’s that simple. Going to court is a waste because they’re simply going to find in favor of the creditor.
    However, with that said, LHDR still has the ability to negotiate with your creditor, even if there is a judgement, and has been very successful in the past at doing so.

    I understand that it’s a very uncomfortable situation, but (and I say this very sincerely), try to be as business minded as possible. Don’t let the creditors scare you, or play with your emotions. Stay the course. Follow the program. Remember, the program lasts for many months. It’s not a 6 month program. When you buy a car, you’re not just buying the tires. You’re buying the complete car. Similarly, you’ve got to be prepared to run the complete program to experience the effects of paying off your creditors.

    Remember: Your creditor probably got bail out funds from the government already. You didn’t. This means they were financially insolvent well before you were. I wish you luck in your endeavorer.

    • Observer

      Nick,

      I responded to a comment of yours in a different LHDR post a moment ago, then I came upon this one.

      You, Sir Nick, are not doing Kim any favors by minimizing the lawsuit. You come across intelligent enough, which is why I assume you are aware that lawsuits turn into judgments which lead to garnishment, levy and liens in order to collect on said judgments. That is most certainly a big deal.

      You failed to point out to Kim that it is quite likely her mothers participation with LHDR is what led to the suit. Lets see:

      LHDR payments are paid up front, having paid them, only now are they starting to settle the small accounts.

      The account being sued on could have been avoided by settling it earlier, but that strategy never had a chance because LHDR fees were more important than Kim’s mom’s success. Marketing affiliates for LHDR such as yourself also place a higher importance on getting paid their commissions than on their victi…. ummmm…. customers success.

      The suit against Kim’s mom was likely brought about by LHDR sending in a limited POA in the first place.

      Why do you suggest not spending too much time or money on an attorney for court? Is Legal Debt Helpers not supported by attorneys? Is that not the assumption Kim’s mom had when she enrolled? Does not the name “Legal Debt Helpers” imply legal support? You mean she does not have access to an attorney?

      Kim – What state is your mom in? You/She may indeed want to speak with an attorney. Not for the credit card suit, but to represent you in a claim against LHDR.

      By the way, your car analogy is stupid and your reference to the banks being bailed out in order to attach an emotional aspect to a consumers hardship is equally stupid.

  • ComplianceSlave

    Tell her to go meet with their attorney…. Supposedly they have one in your state or at least that’s what their old website said. If they don’t but told you you were hiring a lawyer when she signed, call the AG and state bar- Its unauthorized practice of law. It probably is anyway as Im sure the attorney in your state has never seen your file.

  • http://www.ftc.gov ComplianceSlave

    Tell her to go meet with their attorney…. Supposedly they have one in your state or at least that’s what their old website said. If they don’t but told you you were hiring a lawyer when she signed, call the AG and state bar- Its unauthorized practice of law. It probably is anyway as Im sure the attorney in your state has never seen your file.

Get My FREE Get Out of Debt Guy Newsletter

It is the smart thing to do.

I promise to keep your email safe and secure.

Close

I want to keep you posted each weekday with just one email about the latest get out of debt news, scam alerts and information to beat back debt.

You can unsubscribe at any time with just one click.

After you subscribe, check your email to confirm your subscription. If the confirmation email does not appear in your inbox in a few minutes, check your spam folder for it. Sometimes it likes to annoyingly hide there.


  • It will keep you posted on the latest scams.
  • You will be alerted to the latest articles.
  • You will wind up smarter than everyone else dealing with debt.