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Beware of the Capital Currency Control Certificate Scam

Written by Steve Rhode

Fictitious correspondence, allegedly issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) regarding funds purportedly under the control of the OCC and possibly other government entities, is in circulation. Correspondence may be distributed via e-mail, fax, or postal mail.

Any document claiming that the OCC is involved in holding any funds for the benefit of any individual or entity is fraudulent. The OCC does not participate in the transfer of funds for, or on behalf of, individuals, business enterprises, or governmental entities.

The correspondence may indicate that funds are being held by Bank of America and that the recipient will be required to pay a mandatory administrative charge for an issuance of a Capital Currency Control Certificate to release the funds to the beneficiary.

Below are copies of the fraudulent documents, which include a solicitation as well as an invoice. This material is being sent to consumers in an attempt to elicit funds from them and to gather personal information to be used in possible future identification theft.

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The correspondence in question contains the name of a fictitious OCC employee. In addition, the material contains telephone numbers, addresses, and e-mail addresses that are not associated with the OCC or Bank of America.

Before responding in any manner to any proposal supposedly issued by the OCC that requests personal information or personal account information or that requires the payment of any fee in connection with the proposal, recipients should take steps to verify that the proposal is legitimate. At a minimum, the OCC recommends that consumers:

  • contact the OCC directly to verify the legitimacy of the proposal (1) via e-mail at [email protected]; (2) by mail to the OCC’s Special Supervision Division, 400 7th Street, SW, Suite 3E-218; MS 8E-12, Washington, D.C. 20219; (3) via fax to (571) 293-4925; or (4) by calling the Special Supervision Division at (202) 649-6450.
  • contact state or local law enforcement.
  • file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov if the proposal appears to be fraudulent and was received via e-mail or the Internet.
  • file a complaint with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service by telephone at (888) 877-7644; by mail at U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Office of Inspector General, Operations Support Group, 222 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 1250, Chicago, IL 60606-6100; or via the online complaint form,if the proposal appears to be fraudulent and was delivered through the U.S. Postal Service.

Sincerly,
Steve

You are not alone. I'm here to help. There is no need to suffer in silence. We can get through this. Tomorrow can be better than today. Don't give up.


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About the author

Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.

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