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Consumer Mediation Services Opens to Help Scammed Consumers

A new type of company has just opened to help consumers that may have been scammed by a debt relief company, and is looking for money back, but getting nowhere. We all know how frustrating that is.

If you are the consumer and you didn’t get the services that were sold to you, the matter could be put to rest if the debt relief company would just refund your hard earned money they didn’t earn and say they were sorry for not being able to deliver. But that just doesn’t seem to happen.

I wish this new breed of consumer defender the best of luck in their efforts and hope this turns into something really big for consumers who have been taken but just want a fair and reasonable resolution.

It may also turn out to be something big for debt relief companies that work closely with this new company, Consumer Mediation Services, and that can develop an exceptional reputation of being prompt, professional and consumer friendly.

As I’ve always said about life in general, it’s not if a problem may erupt along the way, it’s how the company responds to it that’s important.

So for now I’m enthusiastically optimistic about this new type of consumer assistance and welcome all feedback from people that use the service. If they do a great job for consumers and you feel you’ve been treated well by CMS, let’s praise the heck out of them.

And if you are a debt relief company and you are contacted by CMS, let’s hear from you as well to see if you feel the interaction by CMS was fair, reasonable, and helpful.

What follows is the initial press release sent out by Consumer Mediation Services.

Consumer Mediation Services Opens to Help Scammed Consumers
Get Out of Debt Guy – Twitter, G+, Facebook

Consumer Mediation Services Opens to Help Scammed Consumers

Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Mesa, Arizona

“When you’ve done something long enough, you become good at it… When I was growing up I was really obnoxious… Thirty one years later I’m still at it.” But can being obnoxious really be a talent?

Consumer Mediation Services agents say “YES” – and they are quite good at it. Consumer Mediation Services is a fraud fighting company that provides a unique, strategic and powerful method of dispute resolution for anyone who paid for a service and got scammed.

Need an example? Hundreds of companies promise to help struggling consumers “become debt free in two years or less” every single day; we’ve all heard those commercials practically screaming at us through the radio “we can cut your debt by up to seventy percent” or “we can modify your home loan today.” Today a high volume of complaints are being submitted to CMS about law firms offering to settle debt. Unfortunately, the reality is that many can’t get you out of debt as easy as they make you believe. And they know it. But they still take your money.

Consumer Mediation Services has made it their goal to help consumers who have been scammed; with an emphasis on the debt relief industry.

“Too many companies are lying to people with the empty promise of help. These people are paying large fees with money they can’t afford to pay… and even worse, most will likely never get what they are paying for.”

So how does ‘being obnoxious’ play a role into the Consumer Mediation Services operations? Simply put, if a company is operating with questionable motives, CMS will find and expose them in the most unique methods. “We find out who the bad guys are, and then we go to work on them. We speak a language they understand very, very well.”

According to one CMS agent “we don’t take on every complaint. We know how to sift through the complaints we receive to find the true victims of a scam. Not all companies are bad just because we receive a complaint about them. Many companies will actually try to fix the situation quickly. It’s the bad companies that we have so much fun with.”

CMS says that “most bad companies aren’t intimidated by customer complaints because their customers aren’t knowledgeable on the laws and regulations for that industry and can’t escalate complaints properly. That’s where we achieve maximum results… we know how they advertise and how they lure their customers in with empty promises of financial freedom.”

Another agent adds to that “If no resolution is made within 14 days of the initial complaint, we increase turn up the volume a bit.”

With actions ranging from online campaigns to regulatory and media communication, if the company shows no desire to resolve the complaint, CMS will attack the lifeline of the company: future cash flow. “Alongside standard complaint presentation, we may just find out who owns the company, gather the camera crew and ask him a question or two in Starbucks… or better yet, at his church on Sunday morning or at their child’s little league game on a Tuesday evening… Then we’ll send the story to Channel Seven News and maybe a federal regulator or two… ”

Consumer Mediation Services’ primary objective holds two purposes: helping consumers get their money back and preventing companies from victimizing more people with their deception.

Understandably, the Consumer Mediation Services agents remain anonymous in the public eye as their ability to participate in trade conferences, seminars and other events may be jeopardized. “If they knew who we were, they certainly wouldn’t let us in the room.”
CMS director says “We need help creating awareness. Consumers usually don’t get refunds because they don’t know how to approach the situation. That’s where we can help. Social networking drives our business.”

Follow the fight against fraud. Power is found in numbers. Follow Consumer Mediation Services at www.facebook.com/consumermediationservices and www.Twitter.com/fraudsniffer.

Consumer Mediation Services
PO Box 7923
Mesa, Arizona 85216-7923
(855) No Scam 5
(855) 667-2265
[email protected]

Consumer Mediation Services Opens to Help Scammed Consumers by

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About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode
Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.
  • Melissa

    Jonathan I am very confused about your CMS business model as you describe it and maybe you can further explain.

    You do not charge a fee until you finally get results and you offer your services to consumers nationally.

    I have read what you describe as your tactics for collection of consumer’s money and am wondering how you can afford to take on a client in one part of the country who says they are out a few thousand dollars paid to a non performing DSC based in another part of the country.

    With no money from the client will you really travel across country, hook up with a TV station news crew and harrass your target at their church on a Sunday?

    This is not an attack…and I wish you well…I just don’t get it and I have read all of your posts.

  • Fredrick Haas

    Steve the link you provided to Morgan Drexen posting stated that CMS would waive their advanced fee for that particular case. This would indicate that their normal business practices do in fact include an advanced fee charged for their services. Are we missing something?

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      It is my understanding that is their policy now for everyone. If you feel I’m wrong, please contact them to check.

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        CMS charges no upfront fees and as of last week we announced that our services are 100% free. we charge no fees whatsoever. Read the press releases…

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Also, for the record, we helped with many refunds over the past couple weeks and haven’t charged a penny. I’m not hurting, and I can’t stand what this industry now represents… So, if you didn’t catch that, I help people for free. Any more questions?

      • http://northeast-properties.com Andy Faria

        Now that’s a program I could support. I have about 200 people for you.

        You really do it for free now?

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        YES ANDY, YOU READ THAT CORRECTLY. YOU SEE, WE NEVER INTENDED ON CHARGING AN UPFRONT FEE. REMEMBER THE WHOLE “SIXTY BUCKS UP FRONT” TOPIC? WELL, I DID THAT TO STIR THE POT. TO SEE WHO THE SHIT TALKERS WERE. AND ONCE I FOUND OUT WHO THEY WERE, I STIRRED THE POT TO GENERATE A LITTLE CONTROVERSY. I’M NOT CHARGING A PENNY FOR MY HELP.  IF SOMEBODY GOT SCREWED, THEY NEED HELP. I AM GOING TO HELP THEM. 

        I STIRRED THE POT ENOUGH TO CREATE AN AWARENESS. NOW PEOPLE NOW WHO I AM AND WHAT I AM GOING TO DO, AND I AM READY TO HELP CONSUMERS FIGHT BACK, FOR ABSOLUTELY 100% FREE. I HAVE MY LIFE IN ORDER, I HAVE MY FUTURE SECURED. I DONT NEED TO CHARGE. MY INTEREST HERE IS TO SAY FUCK YOU TO ANYBODY WHO DISLIKED MY SERVICE FROM THE BEGINNING. THE PURPOSE OF ME STIRRING THE POT WAS TO SEE WHO WOULD SPEAK OUT AGAINST MY PRESENCE. ALL THE MORONS WHO SPOKE DOWN ABOUT MY PRESENCE ARE OBVIOUSLY DOING SOMETHING WRONG, BAR NONE. THE ONES WHO ASKED QUESTIONS AND ONCE THEY REALIZED THE RIGHT THING WAS SUPPORTING THE CAUSE, WELL, YOU GUYS ARE AWESOME. TO THOSE WHO QUESTIONED MY MOTIVES: WAIT A SEC, YOU THING I AM DOING SOMETHING WRONG?  WHAT ABOUT NOW? THE ONLY THING THAT CHANGED IS THAT NOW I AM WORKING FOR FREE. SAME SERVICE WORKING TO GET YOUR ASSES SHUT DOWN. JUST NOW ITS FOR FREE.  I DARE YOU ALL TO WORK FOR FREE. NOW THAT YOU KNOW I AM HERE FOR ONE REASON: TO GET THE CROOKS SHUT DOWN WITHOUT  A PENNY COMING BACK TO ME, ANYBODY WHO STILL SAYS MY INTENTIONS ARE NOT RIGHT CAN EAT SHIT. 

      • allison

        Sorry CMS, but I’m not buying into this still. Horrific blogging and people skills, a complete 180 within a couple weeks regarding your  business plan, the appearance of a one-man show company, and the already aforementioned legal and ethical questions-it puts a picture of your operation in my mind that’s not professional and I don’t think the big guns will take too seriously, except when they decide to bury you with suits..

      • http://northeast-properties.com Andy Faria

        awww c’mon allison go easy on the guy. He just announced that he’s helping people for free, What more could you want? 

        Instead of the getoutofdebtguy, he’s the getarefundguy. Where’s the harm in that?

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        It’s not down. See http://getoutofdebt.org/31763/

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Whatever you guys say. HA.. Wait till I get a complaint about you from somebody you screwed. And Allison, I am not in the “people” business here. I am in the “fighting back” business. Sorry to disappoint. 

        Guest, not sure that most of your post is relevant to this thread… But, whatever. Hate on. 

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        Interesting how the haters are all brave and stuff when they fire shots from the shadows, afraid to say who they are.

      • allison

         How come if it’s free now as you said, your website says
        “We don’t charge you a penny until we get you a refund. We only get paid based
        on how successful our efforts are!”
        LOL, how do you consider working on a contingency the same as doing it free?
        Contact form
        submitted!
        We will be in touch soon.

      • allison

        Steve, really!? We get called out on an anonymous blog if we don’t agree? I guess I’ll keep my comments to myself then and rethink my following.

      • Melissa

        To Allison’s comment - You nailed it again Allison!

      • Lotto winner

        Good
        luck CMS …I hope you are independently wealthy cause when Freedom Debt Reliefs
        x clients see this you will be employing half the state of AZ

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        HAHA. PEOPLE JUST NEED TO LEARN TO FIGHT BACK. 

  • asdf jkl;

    Hey CMS, you’d better stop your advance fee scheme because the FTC just went after a similar scam:
    http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2011/11/businessrecovery.shtm

    Steve, you should publicly recognize the advance fee scam that CMS is perpetuating.  UPL to boot, I mean, c’mon, CMS is NOT mediating but advocating on BEHALF OF A CONSUMER that affects the consumer’s legal rights.  THIS IS CLEAR AS DAY and the CA & AZ bar associations are looking into this.

    • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

      But CMS does not charge an advance fee anymore.

      The other group you mentioned was “misrepresenting the nature and effectiveness of their services, and accepting advance payments from consumers for recovering money lost in previous telemarketing transactions without waiting seven business days for the consumers to receive the recovered money, as required by the Rule.”

      I read the other complaint at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/1123009/110302brscmpt.pdf and don’t see significant similarities.

      Am not aware of CMS doing the same thing as they were. Are you?

      • asdf jkl;

        I wasn’t aware that CMS did a 180 and stopped charging advanced fees.  Just so that we’re clear – CMS doesn’t get paid a single penny unless and until the consumer receives a monetary refund?

        Even though they may have stopped charging advance fees, the bigger problem here is their UPL.  

        Why don’t you ask NACA or the NCLC about their opinion as to what CMS does?  And, make no mistake, even though CMS likes to go around touting they are a “mediation” service, they unequivocally are ADVOCATING on BEHALF of a CONSUMER.  A consumer who may have been scammed by a debt relief provider has a LEGAL claim against that provider.  When CMS comes in and helps that consumer obtain a refund, they ARE PRACTICING LAW!!!

        If you don’t believe me, ask some experts.  They’ll tell ya!

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        So I get the point you appear to not like the CMS model of fighting for consumers but tell me who consumers who feel they have been harmed can go to for little to no advanced fee and have someone attempt to get them their money back or their problem resolved?

      • asdf jkl;

        Aggrieved consumers can seek the assistance of a properly licensed attorney, like those found in NACA (http://www.naca.net/find-attorney). Most, if not all, of these consumer attorneys will take such matters on contingency because most state UDAP statutes allow for attorneys fees (which are paid by the wrong-doer, in this case the debt relief provider).

        Look, I’m all for CMS’ stated goal here – that is, to help consumers who’ve been scammed by a debt relief provider obtain monetary redress.  But, just because the goal is laudable, doesn’t make CMS’ actions legal (or ethical).  Steve, you’re smart enough to know that the ends can’t justify the means.

        Again, why don’t you reach out to a bona fide consumer attorney and get his or her take on it.  As a journalist, you should (and must) care to properly and fully investigate a story.  You put this in play by reporting on CMS – now do your due diligence my friend!! 

        So, are you or are you not going to investigate the (potential) unauthorized practice of law by the CMS outfit?!

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        Are you saying that CMS is practicing UPL because they are attempting to assist the consumer with a customer service issue?

        Did they say they were going to represent consumers in court, prepare pleadings or give legal advice?

        If what CMS proposed to do is UPL then every local television station that investigates consumer issues would be guilty as well.

        Or are you saying that helping someone to get some sort of redress is an effort that can only be performed by a lawyer? I’m not clear on what your UPL assertion is.

        And while you are at it, please identify yourself so readers can figure out your experience with such issues.

      • asdf jkl;

        By the way, please make it absolutely clear for your readers that CMS doesn’t get paid a SINGLE penny UNLESS and UNTIL the consumer receives a monetary refund.  Everyone has a right to know.

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        They already made that announcement in other comments on the site. Does their site say something different?

      • asdf jkl;

        Could you please provide the link to the comment(s) in which CMS stated that they don’t receive a single penny unless and until the consumer receives monetary redress – I couldn’t find that comment.

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode
      • asdf jkl;

        Steve, you’re getting it twisted – CMS is NOT assisting a consumer with a customer service matter – rather, they are attempting to obtain monetary redress for a consumer.  They are ADVOCATING on behalf of a consumer in exchange for monetary compensation (CMS charges a fee if they’re able to get a consumer monetary redress).
        Here is what they are doing:1. An aggrieved consumer has a potential claim against a business (a debt relief provider);2. The consumer hires CMS to represent their interest and try and obtain monetary redress.3. Said consumer pays CMS 30% of the total recovery.

        THIS IS UPL!!!!

        Your example of a news network (e.g. Channel 5 on your side) DOES NOT CHARGE A SINGLE PENNY FOR THEIR SERVICE!!!!!!!!!  

        Doing the three things I listed above is MOST CERTAINLY the practice of law!  Why don’t you ask a consumer attorney and quit thinking you understand what the practice of law means.  SIMPLY ASK a  NACA attorney.  Or even ask the NCLC.  Or even ask Elizabeth Warren.  Do your due diligence, dude! (alliteration much?!) 

      • http://GetOutOfDebt.org Steve Rhode

        There are certainly other examples of advocates that are paid a fee for helping consumers. There are paid patient advocates, personal assistants, senior assistants, daily money managers, disability advocates, medical billing advocates, etc.

        What makes the CMS representation different than those other examples that also assist consumers for a fee to resolve problems and at times make a recovery?

        To be clear, I’m not standing up to fight for CMS, just trying understand your position to see if it is opinion based or fact based.

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        You are a moron

  • allison

    There is an old saying..Those who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.

    I sorry, but all I see here is someone(s) whose business model got ravaged by the TSR and instead of making  an honest living doing it the right way, plans on looking to hook companies for doing probably far less in the area of shady practices. I see the same problems for you others mentioned, which probably will result in a rather quick implosion.  Looking at the debt relief industry today, I can’t see any service that has a pool of clients you could help with any real substance.

    Debt Settlement: Non law firms are either gone,  partnered up, or trying to do it right. The latter has no set up money so no business for you there. As noted, the law firms will eat you alive.

    Debt Management: All that are left are licensed up and charge no or little up front money. Going after a reputable CCC organization to get a client $75 back before your cut? No business in this area at all.

    Mortgage Modifications: The FTC and State Attorneys will clean the last stragglers out well before you can solicate their Agreement holders.

    Tax Modifications: Not nearly as much bad press but when you are dealing with the IRS, most companies will be on the up and up already if they know what’s good for them.

    As far as trying to get companies on what the did three years ago, that’s pretty weak to build a business around. Again, if they aren’t law firms, they are probably gone by now( just like you), with the exception of the few big guys. How many times do you thing you can tap that well before they go all in with their attorneys after you in return.

    It’s just my opinion, which I formed from only what I see here in black and white and between the lines, but this smells of hypocrisy and a whole lot more.

    • allison

      BTW, I didn’t mean to imply partnering up with a law firm or trying to do it right necessarily meant one or the other. “partnering up AND/or trying to do it right” would be more appropriate

    • Melissa

      You nailed it Allison!

      Mike Reilly also questioned the size of the window of opportunity for CMS.

      CMS has a business model with little or no future and is trying to drum up business from this website by constantly posting comments, many on very old and outdated articles, where were you when these articles were first posted CMS?

      Sorry but I don’t see a future for you CMS maybe you should take a step back and with all of your years of industry experience and knowledge go back to helping consumers (on a performance based model) with their real fight!

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Melissa, please see my last response to Allison above. It basically calls you both stupid, but unfortunately I dont feel like responding to two ignoramuses in one day.

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      Yes, Allison, you NAILED it. I am a hypocrite.

      Melissa, ok, you’re right.  I am sad to say, CMS will be shutting its doors as of right now…

      Now that you both have had your egos stroked a bit, honestly, wake up.

      My last company was a NO ADVANCED FEE company and took place over 12 months prior to the FTC amending the TSR.  I left an advanced fee company (paying me a darn good salary) because I didnt believe in what we were doing.

      MSNBC, Yahoo Finance and WSJ quoted articles about me and my company: “an industry pioneer, dedicated to delivering a service before charging even a penny.” The problem was, I didnt feel it was fair to have to market alongside BS companies saying they are attorney firms, luring struggling consumers in with their sales scripts.  Allison, darling I have written more scripts than you have read, so quiet down. Melissa, sweetheart, I helped develop and grow the ENTIRE wholesale debt model and now that I have seen what it has become, I am ready to provide a check to the ethics of the industry.  So question my knowledge all day long.

      As for my window, yes, MIKE actually nailed it, dont take credit for somebody’s intelligent observation. We know nothing intelligent has come from either of you on this blog. My window is as short as most of the lifespans of the companies in the industry, no doubt. But there are a handful of companies that could keep me in business for a long, long time.

      I am not in this for the money. I dont need a couple hundred bucks. Its a matter of operating an online assassination of the industry that has afforded you some moderately overpriced apartment and a 3 year old Mercedes. I am in this to do just what you both described, only here is a better description, a promise, if you will.

      I will leverage the crooked companies against the fear of not being able to screw somebody else for next month’s payroll to continue the screw cycle. And when you screw the next guy, I will help him or her expose you again, too. How long will this last? As long as the owners of these companies continue to screw people, lie to them and stay out of jail.

      I will not stop until we are to blame for the publicity that led to the shutting down of at least 15 BS front ends, 9 deceptive marketing companies, 8 back end companies that offer ridiculous splits yet inadequate training to their affiliates, both attorney and non attorney based, and 5 other types of misc debt relief products that are screwing consumers out of money they cant afford to be screwed out of.

      And if you dont like it, jump in line behind the guy in the back. Seriously, anyone who is unsupportive of my service shows they are as guilty as sin just by opening your mouth impugning  our cause.  

      Now, I am going to eat some orange chicken and watch last week’s Project Runway so I am up to date for the finale tomorrow.  And pray that your name isnt the sales agent on our next complaint. I dare somebody to actually start “liking” my comments.

      • Mike Reilly

        I liked it but, watch the language tough guy….lol

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Agreed. I was steamed.. Edited. :)

      • Melissa

        Wow CMS you handle things well under pressure…this trait should be very helpful to you in your new endeavors.

        I was not criticizing the work you do or the spirit with which you deliver your message. I have no agenda or battles to fight regarding a service like yours. I simply said that in my opinion there is a shrinking or no market and I agreed with Allison’s opinion.

        I added that to me the multiple posting of your comments (all of a sudden) seems insincere and like your are looking for business opportunities for your new business here.

        I referred to this comment Mike Reilly made: “By the way i can’t figure out the “window” size of your model as clearly things have settled down somewhat, what are your thoughts?” which I had also wondered about.

        I don’t know you (no one hear does I guess) and have no problem with your business model…just passing on my observations…you do need to chill a little (again my opinion)…

        BTW, I searched MSNBC, Yahoo Finance and WSJ for the quote you referenced, all had no results?

        I wish you good luck with your business and will be OK with being wrong with my observations.

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Yes, I left a couple words out so that my name would not be found so easily. Im not an idiot.

        As for my attitude toward you, the fact that you (A) did not support the cause in any manner and (B) started off saying Allison nailed it, you confirmed your position.

        As for my sincerity, I was previously posting as myself, for a while, contributing both my support for regulation and my dissatisfaction for the industry, under my pesonal name, not this company. 2+2=4, get it?

        And if your response was a “plea” for lack of better phrases, to show that you do support CMS, then say it. I dont need to chill, and I do fine under pressure. The very people who speak as to how much they disagree with my service bothers me enough to have ioened this company.

        If you have no agenda, simply support the cause or dont. But dont question my sincerity about helping others fight against scumbags who lie and cheat them. I have read far too many hardship letters to allow the crap that goes on to continue.

        Youre either with me or against. Pick a side.  

      • http://northeast-properties.com Andy Faria

        Ok so this has nothing to do with the validity/legitimacy/longevity of CMS, but something is driving me nuts. After everything I’ve read, I’m about 95% sure that I know exactly who you are.

        I’m not looking to ruin your element of surprise here, but my OCD is driving me to find out for sure.

        How do I go about finding out if my hunch is correct? (sorry, my curiosity is a curse)

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS
      • Mike Reilly

        I “liked” this comment also…especially the last line….bravo

  • UPL

    So, let’s get this straight…

    1. An aggrieved consumer has a potential claim against a business.
    2. The consumer hires you to represent their interest and try and obtain monetary redress.
    3. Said consumer pays you 30% (of which half is paid upfront) of the total recovery (…and I’m sure that the company from which you obtain the monetary settlement will demand that the consumer sign a settlement/release agreement, which releases the company from all further liability)

    My friend, you’ve just engaged in the Unauthorized Practice of Law.  You even use terms such as ‘contingency fee’.

    The California Bar has been forwarded this entire blog thread (in both on- and off- line formats).

    Steve, where are you in all this?  This company is clearly engaged in UPL (…not to mention that these guys charge an upfront fee, which is offensive, especially when you think about the situation where a person, whose “claim” was $10,000 and paid $1,500 upfront, and CMS failed to get them any refund and thus the client is now out $11,500 – adding insult to injury if you ask me.)   

    • UPL

      Here is an excellent source for how each state defines the ‘practice of law’:
      http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/migrated/cpr/model-def/model_def_statutes.authcheckdam.pdf

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Here is an excellent source (wikipedia) on what a contingency fee is: A contingent fee or conditional fee is any fee for services provided where the fee is only payable if there is a favourable result.

        We are such crooks and should be shut down for charging a fee if we perform a service. Wow. What audacity.

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      Offensive? I find you offensive for FINDING US OFFENSIVE UPL..

      Definition of Contingency: A future event or circumstance that is possible but cannot be predicted with certainty.

      Definition of Fee: A payment made for professional advice or services.

      So if CMS charges a “Contingency Fee” fee for a professional service that is paid based on a future circumstance, we are breaking the law? My friend, you are reaching.

      Our “upfront fee” is nominal. We aren’t a debt relief company so we can charge for our service. And if you think $60 is too much for somebody to pay to help them fight scum bag debt relief companies for a $1,000 refund, you are a playing for the opposing team.

      Is the BBB practicing UPL by sending paperwork and asking a company respond to a complaint and leveraging them against a good or bad rating? Is David Horrowitz breaking the law when he “fights back” – no. The only difference is that we get paid for helping the consumer get their money back. We are not attorneys and dont pretend to be. And we dont practice law nor do we supply legal services or advice. We make that very very clear.

      Your assumption: (…and I’m sure that the company from which you obtain the monetary settlement will demand that the consumer sign a settlement/release agreement, which releases the company from all further liability) is incorrect. If the company has a release letter, it is between the consumer and the company. Do DSC’s send mutual releases to every cancellation? Or just the customers they are scared of… HA!

      Anyway, we dont get involved in that. Our language is limited to simpleton gobbledygook like “liar liar pants on fire” and “we’re telling on you.” 

      We arent arguing contracts or drafting mutual releases. Dont assume things. It wastes everyones time.
      The pope has been forwarded this entire blog, because we would ask him to pray for your quick and irrational presumptiveness.

      • UPL

        By the way, what if the refund amount is $100,000 – then your upfront fee is $6,000!!!  See, I can play games with numbers as well, you moron!

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        You think somebody out there paid a hundred grand IN FEES to a debt settlement company and you say I’m the moron? I feel sorry for you. You my friend, are ignorant. Stop playing with numbers and go back to Lincoln Logs and Brio train sets.

        For the record, to anyone else reading this, if the CMS upfront fee is too hefty, our agreements are all situational, and we ALWAYS work with our customers’ affordability. It’s just that most people dont have a problem coming up with our fee which, as our agreement states, will NEVER EXCEED $250 UP FRONT. Some people just allow their ignorance to jump to conclusions.

        DO YOU DISLIKE THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE? IT’S PROBABLY YOUR GUILTY CONSCIENCE SPEAKING OUT LOUD…

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        OK, so here’s another play on numbers. On a typical 15% model, the person would have had to enrolled how much debt to have paid 100k in fees? The answer? $666,666. Ironic? I knew you were working for the wrong side…

        Right will always conquer. Always. I’m just here to help push things in the right dirction.

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      BTW, we refund our customers half their money up to the entire amount, based on the situation, if we fail to get them their money back.

      Conclusions conclusions. Dont jump to them.  

      • Aa

        You’re not mediating, you are ADVOCATING on behalf of a consumer (if it smells like a duck, quacks like a duck…)

        You’re clearly a hack and the public must be protected from your unauthorized practice of law.

        I’ve now forwarded a complaint to the Arizona Bar as well.

        If you knew what was good for you, you’d crawl to car warranties or diet pills or whatever is the next slimy scheme that Robby has hatched up. 

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Who is Robby? I am not who you guys think I am. Ha. If you could, please email “Robby” and have him contact me becasue you’re obviously intimidated by this “Robby” guy or you wouldn’t be assuming I am him.  

        You guys think I am intimidated by you? It’ll take a lot more than your smarmy posts on getoutofdebt.org to make me stop what I am doing. So come on out to Arizona, and pack a lunch babe. Know this: your childish threats dont intimidate me one bit.  I am here for the long haul, and I will get the job done.

        Am I an advocate? Yeah, sure. But yes, we are mediators. As defined by the most commonly accepted dictionary in America: Mediation: Intervene in a dispute to bring about an agreement or reconciliation

        There is NOTHING that states you must be a lawyer to be a mediator. In fact, I’ll bet a hundred bucks that says you and the idiot in the post above hiding behind the name UPL work for an attorney backed DSC. And I am engaged in UPL?

        You see consumers, this is how the companies bully others. They refuse to give you a refund when their service fails you. then somebody like me comes along and they try to scare me with threats. I know better. I can deal with these chazzards all day long.

        Hey friend, what’s the name of your company. Let’s see how many complaints you have with State BARs and other agencies.

        I’ll eventually get to you pal. And when I do, you’ll be the one working for some scumbag call center selling car warranties and direct tv.   

        DO YOU DISLIKE THE SERVICE WE PROVIDE? IT’S PROBABLY YOUR GUILTY CONSCIENCE SPEAKING OUT LOUD…

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        From the highest traffic website regarding mediation:

        “Although many states recommend qualifications for mediators, no state has
        requirements for the practice of mediation. In any state, a mediator can
        practice in private settings without being licensed, certified, or listed.”

        I hope we can put this argument to bed now.

        Gent’s, I am not going anywhere. So bring it on.

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      Question, Who ever said we charge half our success fee up front? Our fee is like this:

      If somebody paid $1000 to a DSC and wants a refund, we charge the following.

      30% of the total refund amount ONCE collected. the only fee we charge initially is a small percentage of that. Twnety percent max, to be exact. In other words, our upfront fee will NEVER EXCEED $250. 

      $1,000 refund
      $60 up front fee.
      When $1,000 is refunded, we charge the remiaining $240 out of the refund proceeds.
      Consumer gets a net refund of $700.

      Is that really so unfair?   

  • allison

    “Why would CMS make trouble for the good companies?”
    See fee schedule above.
    You don’t do this for free or charity. You built a business to exploit the vulnerability of the remaining firms in the industry. 
    “We have
    been involved in this industry and related industries for
    years both directly
    and indirectly.”
    So why the shift? Why not stay in the industry, servicing clients ethically and honestly as I’m sure you did when things were lucrative even for performance based companies. Are you saying you all were perfect, and could have passed all the elements of the very attacks plans you plan on implicating on others?

    • Consumer Mediation Services

      What about our fee schedule? Yes, we charge a fair price for our service. No, we dont do it for charity. We made a shift because the industry is broken and needs to be repaired. You can’t just expect change with the TSR passing. Too many companies are taking advantage of loopholes that have created a fales sense of protection for the compnay, enabling them to screw people even worse! Why no support if you are all for helping to clean up the industry? Wow. 

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      What about our fee schedule? Yes, we charge a fair price for our service. No, we dont do it for charity. We made a shift because the industry is broken and needs to be repaired. You can’t just expect change with the TSR passing. Too many companies are taking advantage of loopholes that have created a fales sense of protection for the compnay, enabling them to screw people even worse! Why no support if you are all for helping to clean up the industry? Wow.     

  • Mike Reilly

    Are they performance based? What is the fee charged to the consumer, perhaps a percentage of the return or a flat fee of some kind? I’ll bet a small upfront to cover cash flow followed by a % of return. What happens if no return, consumer loses?

    • Consumer Mediation Services

      Great
      question Mike! The fee is performance based. Let’s say “Joe Debtor”
      paid “ABC Debt Co” $1,000 over the past 6 months and received no
      service: CMS charges a 30% contingency fee. That’s $700 to the customer and
      $300 to CMS if the full amount is refunded. You mentioned upfront cost? Yes, we
      take 20% of our projected contingency fee of $300  – so the customer would pay us
      $60 up front, which is deducted from the total $300 at time refund is received.
      Low up front cost to pay to have somebody knowledgeable relentlessly fight for your
      $1,000 refund for $60 out of pocket, wouldn’t you agree?

      • Jeffreymilman

        Innovative approach to marketing for debt settlement services.  You deserve a pat on the back. 

        This is one of the more clever approaches to earn an upfront fee for debt relief services by taking money from another provider. 

        Good luck!

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        CMS does not provide debt relief services. our ONLY product is trying to get refunds for consumers. We do not perform any other service other than that.

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        Jeffreymilman Consumer Mediation Services (us) was filed with the State of Arizona on 10/13/2011. The company you are referring to is actually the following. Thank you for bringing this to our attention. Hopefully this clarifies things. If you would like, we will be glad to go after them for your refund of $3,445!!!

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        CMS does not provide debt relief services. our ONLY product is trying to get refunds for consumers. We do not perform any other service other than that.     

      • Mike Reilly

        CMS, you didn’t answer the last question. What happens if you fail or the DSC goes belly up 2 weeks after the consumer engages your service?

        Lets say the consumer paid out $3500 to the DSC, does the consumer loses $210.00…. or are the funds returned as little or no service is performed? If yes, how is that spelled out in your contract?

        Thanks

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        If no refund is made with CMS having made “substantial efforts” then half the $210 would be refunded. If the company goes belly up before we invest any substantial resources, a refund would be issued as we would not be able to justify taking money and not even trying. Our Agreement reflects scenarios as such. Great question.

      • http://northeast-properties.com Andy Faria

        I think a service like this would be more genuine if you lost the upfront fee. Charging an upfront fee, to go collect on another upfront fee… i don’t know, kinda weird.

        If we guess who you are will you unmask yourself?

        … first guess is yours Mike

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        Good perspective, but it’s not just “charging a fee to collect another…”  We all know DSC’s stand three levels deep under Virtual Offices, PO Boxes, forwarded addresses and numbers and Fictitious Names. We go the extra mile, and that costs money. Our initial fee is nothing more than what we think it will take to “be heard” by the company we are going up against. If it’s a small refund, maybe a grand, we dont think it will be too hard to be heard by them. They have a grand to give back. Now, if its a 13k refund, we have a different story. Now we have to find more leverage. Maybe a background check, travel to the office, spend some time secret shopping the company depending on the severity of the complaint. If we know somebody paid Nationwide 2500 over the last two years, with little to no result, we have a decent shot at little to no resistance. If somebody paid Morgan Drexen $6,500 over the last 3 months, we may need to increase our initial game. We aren’t just chasing pennies through a phone. We are being seen, heard and noticed. The companies who are screwing people won’t want to go too many rounds with us. After all, they took somebody’s money, and din’t perform. How long do you think they can go on no defense?

        So, as you can see, the small upfront fee is justified. The previous example of charging $60 to help recover a $1,000 refund seems pretty reasonable. Chasing $1000 with $60 is reasonable on all levels, especially when we know we are “right.” Thats why we structured it that to make sense for everyone.

        And no, my name isn’t Mike :)

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Good perspective, but it’s not just “charging a fee to collect another…” We all know DSC’s stand three levels deep under Virtual Offices, PO Boxes, forwarded addresses and numbers and Fictitious Names. We go the extra mile, and that costs money. Our initial fee is nothing more than what we think it will take to “be heard” by the company we are going up against. If it’s a small refund, maybe a grand, we dont think it will be too hard to be heard by them. They have a grand to give back. Now, if its a 13k refund, we have a different story. Now we have to find more leverage. Maybe a background check, travel to the office, spend some time secret shopping the company depending on the severity of the complaint. If we know somebody paid Nationwide 2500 over the last two years, with little to no result, we have a decent shot at little to no resistance. If somebody paid Morgan Drexen $6,500 over the last 3 months, we may need to increase our initial game. We aren’t just chasing pennies through a phone. We are being seen, heard and noticed. The companies who are screwing people won’t want to go too many rounds with us. After all, they took somebody’s money, and din’t perform. How long do you think they can go on no defense?

        So, as you can see, the small upfront fee is justified. The previous example of charging $60 to help recover a $1,000 refund seems pretty reasonable. Chasing $1000 with $60 is reasonable on all levels, especially when we know we are “right.” Thats why we structured it that to make sense for everyone.

        And no, my name isn’t Mike :)

      • http://northeast-properties.com Andy Faria

        So how would this compare to filing a complaint in small claims for usually about a hundred bucks?

        As a business owner myself, a legal complaint is something that would always get my attention, and would certainly prompt an immediate response. and most likely an immediate settlement.

         ….but quite honestly, you snapping pictures of me smoking butts and pacing outside my office, while it would absolutely get my attention, would probably be for the wrong reasons.

        Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for cleaning up debt relief, and bringing the bad guys down. I hope your succesfull, but without the abilty to file a legal complaint for someone, it may just be a business built on “all bark, no bite”

        just my two cents, good luck.

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        That is
        where you just confirmed you are a good guy. The bad guy is outside smoking
        butts, yelling and screaming at a camera, cursing at the top of his lungs. He
        goes back in to his office, eventually realizes that not giving “Joe
        Schmoe” back their money may cost t him his (Bentley, House, Relationship, Ability to screw more people, next
        hundred grand off the same scam… etc…)  And yes, it DOES get their attention.

        You see,
        the bad guys fear the loss of what they have and what they know. Good guys know that we all
        have to work for our dollars. That’s why when we handle a “bad guy”
        we attack him where it hurts the most. And when they realize they are in
        trouble, they put the fire out to try and extend their gig.

        We most certainly
        have the ability to “discuss” legal remedies with third parties and
        by all means refer the situation to an attorney if needs be. But helping
        consumers gather information for a class action would be much more appropriate
        for somebody in our position. And that takes money. If it’s “bad apples” you call
        them, well, then we’re gonna make some apple sauce.  

        But you
        missed the biggest point of all: I have stood in many courtrooms: it’s not what
        you know, but what you can prove. Most consumers can not argue this industry
        for themselves, or they would be able to get their own refund. Look at the guy above
        who (A) thinks we are somebody else when (B) he got screwed out of more than
        3g’s two and a half years ago. Who lets that happen? People who can’t get
        results, that’s who.

        ‘Id be
        willing to be that if we got him as a customer, he would get his money back. I
        gave him the offer. Maybe he just doesn’t need three grand… or two grand… or
        any grand. You see, he made more of a focus on who he thought we were rather
        than say “HEY A$$HOLE YOU SCREWED ME TWO AND A HALF YEARS AGO” – If
        he truly thought we were the other company that he got scammed by, which he
        obviously did until i corrected that issue, he should have done much more than
        simply “post a copy of a website and practically say “hey everybody, come
        see how bad I got screwed”

        We do it
        a bit more aggressive than that…   Wait until some big fake law firm in Orange County CA makes out with 60 million in consumer trust funds. Then people will understand what we are here to do.  

        You see,
        the bad guys fear the loss of what they have and what they know. Good guys know that we all
        have to work for our dollars. That’s why when we handle a “bad guy”
        we attack him where it hurts the most. And when they realize they are in
        trouble, they put the fire out to try and extend their gig.

        We most certainly
        have the ability to “discuss” legal remedies with third parties and
        by all means refer the situation to an attorney if needs be. But helping
        consumers gather information for a class action would be much more appropriate
        for somebody in our position. And that takes money. If it’s “bad apples” you call
        them, well, then we’re gonna make some apple sauce.  

        But you
        missed the biggest point of all: I have stood in many courtrooms: it’s not what
        you know, but what you can prove. Most consumers can not argue this industry
        for themselves, or they would be able to get their own refund. Look at the guy above
        who (A) thinks we are somebody else when (B) he got screwed out of more than
        3g’s two and a half years ago. Who lets that happen? People who can’t get
        results, that’s who.

        ‘Id be
        willing to be that if we got him as a customer, he would get his money back. I
        gave him the offer. Maybe he just doesn’t need three grand… or two grand… or
        any grand. You see, he made more of a focus on who he thought we were rather
        than say “HEY A$$HOLE YOU SCREWED ME TWO AND A HALF YEARS AGO” – If
        he truly thought we were the other company that he got scammed by, which he
        obviously did until i corrected that issue, he should have done much more than
        simply “post a copy of a website and practically say “hey everybody, come
        see how bad I got screwed”

        We do it
        a bit more aggressive than that…   Wait until some big fake law firm in Orange County CA makes out with 60 million in consumer trust funds. Then people will understand what we are here to do.  

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        sorry for the dual post and long format. iPhone issue.

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        That is where you just confirmed you are a good guy. The bad guy is outside smoking butts, yelling and screaming at a camera, cursing at the top of his lungs. He goes back in to his office, eventually realizes that not giving “Joe Schmoe” back their money may cost t him his (Bentley, House, Relationship, Ability to screw more people, next hundred grand off the same scam… etc…) And yes, it DOES get their attention.

        You see, the bad guys fear the loss of what they have and what they know. Good guys know that we all have to work for our dollars. That’s why when we handle a “bad guy” we attack him where it hurts the most. And when they realize they are in trouble, they put the fire out to try and extend their gig.

        We most certainly have the ability to “discuss” legal remedies with third parties and by all means refer the situation to an attorney if needs be. But helping consumers gather information for a class action would be much more appropriate for somebody in our position. And that takes money. If it’s “bad apples” you call them, well, then we’re gonna make some apple sauce.

        But you missed the biggest point of all: I have stood in many courtrooms: it’s not what you know, but what you can prove. Most consumers can not argue this industry for themselves, or they would be able to get their own refund. Look at the guy above who (A) thinks we are somebody else when (B) he got screwed out of more than 3g’s two and a half years ago. Who lets that happen? People who can’t get results, that’s who.

        ‘Id be willing to be that if we got him as a customer, he would get his money back. I gave him the offer. Maybe he just doesn’t need three grand… or two grand… or any grand. You see, he made more of a focus on who he thought we were rather than say “HEY A$$HOLE YOU SCREWED ME TWO AND A HALF YEARS AGO” – If he truly thought we were the other company that he got scammed by, which he obviously did until i corrected that issue, he should have done much more than simply “post a copy of a website and practically say “hey everybody, come
        see how bad I got screwed”

        We do it a bit more aggressive than that… Wait until some big fake law firm in Orange County CA makes out with 60 million in consumer trust funds. Then people will understand what we are here to do. 

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        If no refund is made with CMS having made “substantial efforts” then half the $210 would be refunded. If the company goes belly up before we invest any substantial resources, a refund would be issued as we would not be able to justify taking money and not even trying. Our Agreement reflects scenarios as such. Great question.     

      • Mike Reilly

        CMS, one other question; will you go after consumers that skipped out on DSC that provided great service IE. long term settlement at 40% on 30k then shut down the GCS acct and refuses to pay the contracted fee claiming ignorance?

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        I have to say, I chuckled out loud at that question. That would be a tricky situation. Here is my position on this issue. As you are aware, we are a “customer service” oriented company. Being involved in this industry, I know that is an exposure for the DS provider. The smartest thing to do would be: If a settlement is reached at 40% on a $30k acct, we are assuming there are at least some funds to work with. Somebody with that kind of account balance probably has a higher debt load, so I am assuming they are contributing a decent amount to GCS monthly. The settlement would be $12k, and the DSC fee (assuming a 20% performance fee) would be $3600. Total funds needed: $15,600. It would make the most sense that the consumer would have the risk of losing each settlement if they defaulted on the settlement, as equeally as the risk of the DSC losing their fees if they dont perform. Hence the risk of success being imposed by TSR ammendments. Therefore, in some instances by I feel the DSC should be minimizing exposure by structuring a term settlement. Assuming there is 7k in the GCS account, a four pay settlement would require 2150 amonth for the next 4 months.  Assuming they have a decent contribution to their GCS account each month, lets say their deposit each month into GCS is probably > 1k. That means that if they can come up with another 1050 each month for the next 4 months, they will be able to save a net of  $14,400 afetr paying the 12k settlement amount and 3600 in fees for a net 48% reduction. That is a great deal. GREAT DEAL!  If the consumer cant find 1050 a month for the next four months, they simply cant pay for the service at this time. Its the harsh “either/or” position i am in by answering this question. But trust me, when you have that kind of settlement opportunity, people will find an extra 1k a month for four months. I have been there. Dont get me wrong, I support DS, just not for everyone.  

      • Mike Reilly

        I’m glad I made you laugh, this was a 28 month term settlement equal payments with a major issuer and was actually 45% on 33k or fee was also term based on the monthly contribution. We recorded 1900 and the debtor felt that was enough and called it a day.

        Clearly I am handling the matter, just making a point that it’s not always the DSC!

        By the way i can’t figure out the “window” size of your model as clearly things have settled down somewhat, what are your thoughts?

      • Cupid8889

        thats just the way the ball bounces mikey. sucks, but what are you going to do, sue the consumer for your fee? good luck with that. 1900 is a pretty good payday for what it took to settle that account. hope you decide to move on from it.

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        Cupid8889 I guess thats not as fair as it sounds. Reality is Mike’s company performed a service and is entitled to the fees. What if you charged me $250 to detail my car and when it was done, I only”felt like paying you $115. What if I told you $115 was a pretty decent payday because my car wasnt really”that” dirty…after you sweated in the hot sun for three hours making my paint shine? 
        Not really as fair as it sounds. And it takes man hours to settle debt. Resources, communications, etc. This consumer is what I call a “professional debtor” who figured out a way to work the system at Mike’s expense. Mike, sounds like you did a good thing and got screwed. Sorry to hear that.
        Operating a DSC takes cash and a WELL EARNED commission like that could have helped you market that very testimonial.. Id approach the person and say “ok, you didnt pay us, but we at least need a testimonial out of you so we can show other people that OUR service worked for you…” Let’s face it, that commission, while duly earned, isnt going to keep your lights on. Make something good out of this!

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Cupid8889 I guess thats not as fair as it sounds. Reality is Mike’s company performed a service and is entitled to the fees. What if you charged me $250 to detail my car and when it was done, I only”felt like paying you $115. What if I told you $115 was a pretty decent payday because my car wasnt really”that” dirty…after you sweated in the hot sun for three hours making my paint shine? Not really as fair as it sounds. And it takes man hours to settle debt. Resources, communications, etc. This consumer is what I call a “professional debtor” who figured out a way to work the system at Mike’s expense. Mike, sounds like you did a good thing and got screwed. Sorry to hear that.
        Operating a DSC takes cash and a WELL EARNED commission like that could have helped you market that very testimonial.. Id approach the person and say “ok, you didnt pay us, but we at least need a testimonial out of you so we can show other people that OUR service worked for you…” Let’s face it, that commission, while duly earned, isnt going to keep your lights on. Make something good out of this!     

      • Mike Reilly

        CMS, most of the loopholers/upfront fee guys, today,
        hide behind law firms working the legal model, are you guys well capitalized to
        go up against a med to large law firm that can bury you in paperwork and
        counter with slander and defamation based on their consumer contracts? What if?

        I think you should a carrier that is willing to
        underwrite a large E&O policy, I mean come on,
        you’re  taking the consumers word for it
        that nothings been done? I’m sure your process is detailed but, I‘ve heard
        nothing about a contract review which in my opinion (and in this case) is
        everything when trying to mitigate a settlement/refund…no?

        Like Andy, I wish you
        success; I know I’ll never hear from you.

      • Consumer Mediation Services

        Of course we have a complaint verification process. The complainant will need to provide us with GCS/Noteworld/etc. papers showing all transactions, agreement between them and the servicing company, any emails or other doucments, advertisements, etc. We will definitely turn down a complaint if there is no justifiable documentation for our services. We only go after the blatant situations where nothing has been done and moneis were paid. One company I remember had less than two thousand customers enrolled, almost 20 employees and they had a GCS report of over 3000 potential settlements with a GCS balance > 50% of the creditor balance. That’s terrible. That kind of company is who we are going after. Provide settlements and do your job or get out of the business. At 2,000 customers with an avg of 5 accounts per, thats 10k credit card accounts enrolled. That means almost a third of the debt enrolled could have been settled in one month if they tried to, even at 50%. They werent focussed on settling debt- they were focussed on sales and upfront fees. REMEMBER, we are going after companies that may not be violating the TSR now, but charged a fee when it was still legal and still havenet performed. Also remember that the FTC was not retro and many people enrolled in a DS plan are still paying front loaded fees, legally…

        Also, most of the “law firms” are NOT “law firms” - they are renting a shady attorney for a nominal per file fee. We know the game. So if you think when push comes to shove that the attorney will take us to court, we will simply remind them that what is important is making the issue right. A DSC suing us would be like a crack junkie calling the cops because somebody stole their rock.  And when they go to sleep at night, they will remember that they are the bad guys. Not us.

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        Of course we have a complaint verification process. The complainant will need to provide us with GCS/Noteworld/etc. papers showing all transactions, agreement between them and the servicing company, any emails or other doucments, advertisements, etc. We will definitely turn down a complaint if there is no justifiable documentation for our services. We only go after the blatant situations where nothing has been done and moneis were paid. One company I remember had less than two thousand customers enrolled, almost 20 employees and they had a GCS report of over 3000 potential settlements with a GCS balance > 50% of the creditor balance. That’s terrible. That kind of company is who we are going after. Provide settlements and do your job or get out of the business. At 2,000 customers with an avg of 5 accounts per, thats 10k credit card accounts enrolled. That means almost a third of the debt enrolled could have been settled in one month if they tried to, even at 50%. They werent focussed on settling debt- they were focussed on sales and upfront fees. REMEMBER, we are going after companies that may not be violating the TSR now, but charged a fee when it was still legal and still havenet performed. Also remember that the FTC was not retro and many people enrolled in a DS plan are still paying front loaded fees, legally…

        Also, most of the “law firms” are NOT “law firms” – they are renting a shady attorney for a nominal per file fee. We know the game. So if you think when push comes to shove that the attorney will take us to court, we will simply remind them that what is important is making the issue right. A DSC suing us would be like a crack junkie calling the cops because somebody stole their rock. And when they go to sleep at night, they will remember that they are the bad guys. Not us.     

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        I have to say, I chuckled out loud at that question. That would be a tricky situation. Here is my position on this issue. As you are aware, we are a “customer service” oriented company. Being involved in this industry, I know that is an exposure for the DS provider. The smartest thing to do would be: If a settlement is reached at 40% on a $30k acct, we are assuming there are at least some funds to work with. Somebody with that kind of account balance probably has a higher debt load, so I am assuming they are contributing a decent amount to GCS monthly. The settlement would be $12k, and the DSC fee (assuming a 20% performance fee) would be $3600. Total funds needed: $15,600. It would make the most sense that the consumer would have the risk of losing each settlement if they defaulted on the settlement, as equeally as the risk of the DSC losing their fees if they dont perform. Hence the risk of success being imposed by TSR ammendments. Therefore, in some instances by I feel the DSC should be minimizing exposure by structuring a term settlement. Assuming there is 7k in the GCS account, a four pay settlement would require 2150 amonth for the next 4 months. Assuming they have a decent contribution to their GCS account each month, lets say their deposit each month into GCS is probably > 1k. That means that if they can come up with another 1050 each month for the next 4 months, they will be able to save a net of $14,400 afetr paying the 12k settlement amount and 3600 in fees for a net 48% reduction. That is a great deal. GREAT DEAL! If the consumer cant find 1050 a month for the next four months, they simply cant pay for the service at this time. Its the harsh “either/or” position i am in by answering this question. But trust me, when you have that kind of settlement opportunity, people will find an extra 1k a month for four months. I have been there. Dont get me wrong, I support DS, just not for everyone.     

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      Great question Mike! The fee is performance based. Let’s say “Joe Debtor” paid “ABC Debt Co” $1,000 over the past 6 months and received no service: CMS charges a 30% contingency fee. That’s $700 to the customer and $300 to CMS if the full amount is refunded. You mentioned upfront cost? Yes, we take 20% of our projected contingency fee of $300 – so the customer would pay us $60 up front, which is deducted from the total $300 at time refund is received.
      Low up front cost to pay to have somebody knowledgeable relentlessly fight for your $1,000 refund for $60 out of pocket, wouldn’t you agree?

      • Mike Reilly

        CMS, this is in reply to your 10/20 comment to me at 9:12 pm

        Don’t take this as an attack but, there are a few things jumping out at me….

        1st, you talk about a complaint verification process, things like trust acct review, contract review, advertising review etc… you guys will do this for free before signing up a consumer or is it sign..umm first, take the deposit and them determine it there’s merrit to the case? If no merrit it’s a complete refund?

        2nd, how and where did you get the details on the company with 2000 accounts that uses GCS?
        You stated the following…

         “One company I remember had less than two thousand customers enrolled, almost 20 employees and they had a GCS report of over 3000 potential settlements with a GCS balance > 50% of the creditor balance”…. that’s pretty sensitive data…no?

        And finally, I’m sure you won’t need to worry about small mom & pop debt settlement shops taking you down a legal path however, there are many real law firms out there, operating just the way you like..umm (especially in my home state) that would have no problem checking the depth of your pockets…. just an FYI

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        First, we look at everything they have BEFORE we say “yes” to working on a refund for them. I see the picture you are painting, no offense taken, but that’s not us.

        As for your second question: Where did I get access to such reports? Well, I owned the company. Thirty percent of the company to be exact. Years ago I was issued stock in the company after an undercapitalized business man asked me to help bail him out. After trying to convince my partner and the staff to stop sitting on their asses collecting paychecks, I began making significant operational changes. I commanded results and the staff simply could not perform to my standards.

        I built the company to an average of 10-15 new files daily. We weren’t huge, but we were big enough to where laziness was intolerable. I insisted that we needed to move toward the performance based model. Keep in mind, this was a few years ago, so the TSR amendments wasn’t a factor yet.

        I cracked the whip. I dropped my entire settlement department to minimum wage
        plus commission on each settlement. Ironically, doing anwhere from 150-250 settlements per month, the some of the negotiators would have made more money. We had a very good settlement percentage, at just under 33% which included legal accounts. But that was too little settlements, which in my opinion, negated many aspects of the great work done by the team as a whole. In other words, we did great work, but too little of it by too few people in the high number of staff.

        The company earned no money on settlements; I was simply trying to migrate everybody to a performance based mindset as I was developing a no-advanced-fee model at the same time. As you can imagine, I received ZERO support from my staff.

        One day I was told “we need more business…” I ran that very GCS report I mentioned previously, and it was shocking. I asked “how could we service more business when we are so backed up as it is?” I said “THATS IT.” I was disgusted with how the company had become so content in mediocrity because my partner was the good cop and was buddy buddy with everyone and again, I shut down nearly all wholesale business. At the same time, my partner was leaning toward the attorney model, as he thought that was the new and cool thing to do…

        Call it my Jerry Maguire moment; I sold my interest back to my partner at a highly discounted rate, and I left. At that exact moment of realizing that the very customer service managers salaried at 7k a month, negotiators making $18-$26 per hour and customer service assistants walking in off the street to $16 per hour that I had always been there for when they needed personal time off, pay advances, babysitter cash, etc… were all there to milk the system. Nobody cared about the debtors; it was a small machine of people who were willing to show up to work each day and do enough to go unnoticed. It was pathetic, and humbling.

        I hope that addresses both my knowledge for the business, and my access to information as that. I have been in this industry since 2001. I know the game, and I know the ins and outs of this business. It is sad to see such a decent opportunity be corrupted by a bunch of companies we read about on this site, and others, daily, not delivering results and collecting huge fees.

        Third question, I say that’s ok. My pockets are fine. And if a DSC is going to sue me for doing what is right, you can bet your ass that will be on your local channel 5 news at ten. I will have all the support I need. They just better hope the customer doesn’t have a story too sad.. It might create quite a stir. I can see it now: Debt Settlement Company scams over four thousand dollars from widow of cancer victim, refuses to give her money back, forces her into a BK, then sues consumer advocate for trying to help her…” Remember, all these people are, or at least SHOULD be in some type of hardship. Who will the public support? The debt company that did nothing to earn the fees and put them in a worse spot, or me, the guy trying to get them their money back?

        I dont take this as an attack. The others, maybe. Not yours :) Not sure what the “there are many real law firms out there, operating just the way you like..umm” was about. If you are implying I am acting as a law firm, I most certainly am not. If you are implying there are quite a few DSC’s representing that they are law firms in your area, maybe we should do a focus group and find out if these companies really worked for them. Send me some company names and I will fund the focus group. That would be interesting!

      • Mike Reilly

        Good answers! regarding the last thought, I’m talking real Law firms, with real lawyers. There are plenty of them providing debt settlement work and collecting their fees upfront, in my opinion just moving Mr. & Mrs. Jones down the path to a real soaking before a BK filing.

        Those are the guys I’m talking about…. I wish you luck “Masked Stranger”

        Wait, would you consider yourself a super hero of debt relief….like maybe UnderDog?

      • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

        I only wear my cape to court.

        As for the real law firms with real lawyers, I believe the FTC made it very clear there is no exemption for them either.

        OK, here is my disclaimer to the people taking heavy shots at our services. This is labelled “my personal opinion” from my knowledge of the industry only and is not to be considered legal advice in any way. Ha. What a joke. To my knowledge, the only way a company would be TSR exempt is:  

        *By being a nonprofit
        *By being an Intrastate servicing company
        *By offering Bundled services
        *By enrolling over Intranet only
        *by conducting face to face sales

        As for the nonprof, either you are, or you aren’t. Joint enterprise anyone? Both the FTC and IRS both aggressively enforce laws against bogus 501′s. 

        As for the intrastate deal, where are your leads generated? Do yo have a separate call center or lead provider? Where is your corporation formed? How about data storage or complaince recordings? If you are enrolling CA only residents as a NV corp, you’re not intrastate. If you are a CA corp enrolling CA customers only, ok cool. But if you buy leads form a company in NY, or you use GCS back east, or any other servce that your business depends on and the vendor is located out of your state, you are likely considered not intrastate.

        With the bundled services, well, this is probably the most vague. By offering an assortment of products or services aside from negotiating debts, companies feel they have a chance to charge upfront fees. But by charging for “educational materials, legal insurance” etc. they are charging fees for services traditionally associated with settlement, and typically the costs are not reasonable, therefore the costs are really for settlement services, not some 17 page stapled booklet with a Windows budget template and two paragraphs on how to get out of debt that they are selling for $799. The FTC is not stupid.

        OK, intranet only. The TSR applies when the phone is used, right? No phone, No TSR. but can a consumer truly be adequately informed by reading a website? If so, is the website over promising and deceptively misrepresenting the services with fake testimonials, figures or percentages? It is also likely that although through the internet, Skype, chat and other internet sales functions would at some point not be applicable here…

        Face to face meetings are ridiculous. How long is the presentation? And does the person really have enough information about you to sell you a service in 15 minutes of a quick app that somebody took in their call center in a different state? It’s the new boom for the mobile notaries.. Give me a break. I heard about a company trying to contract Dominos Pizza drivers because “there is one in every major city” to be the face to face sales agent.

        Now, about Law Firms. The loopholes that law firms believe they operate under to hose these people in their most difficult days often leave behind a pool of documentation showing they are not TSR compliant.

        For example, When I first went to meet my attorney I didn’t meet with a paralegal to sell me on using the firm. I met the attorney.  The paralegal didn’t explain what the attorney can do for me. The attorney did. The paralegal didn’t present the retainer agreement. That’s right. The attorney did.

        I’m sure you get my point. Wait, I have one more. If the service I requested from my attorney  is “going to court,” my attorney will perform the service. If the service I requested from them was making a phone call to discuss something, I spoke with my attorney.

        The “service” these law firms provide is debt reducton. 99 out of 100 never speak with the attorney upon enrollment, and almost never does the attorney get on the phone to negotiate a debt. Also, by an attorney taking on cases in more than one state, they are now interstate…

        Regardless, they shouldn’t be charging an upfront fee anyway.

        Keep in mind, this is only referring to REAL law firms. The attorney models are totally different. As much as I like to type, I don’t have it in me at the moment to annihilate that model.

        I’m not playing attorney here. This is all knowledge in public domain. I’m just saying, the devil is in the details with these loopholes that many of these companies operate under and these very loopholes may become nooses before too soon. I suggest they watch where they put their necks.    

  • allison

    What’s in it for them I wonder. Why are they blending in at conferences, spying on companies? How is that mediating? Does the BBB do that? Didn’t the FTC and the states pass laws to reign in rip off companies and aren’t they still around to help the consumer individually?
    I’m all for getting bad players out and seeing their mistreated customers helped, but not this way. They sound like they are going to make their living by harassing debt relief firms, and it would be crazy to think these people will make trouble for only the bad ones.
     

    • Consumer Mediation Services

      Allison, don’t condemn the idea before you hear the results. You have
      made posts about New Life Financial Solutions’ scary contract, Christian Credit
      Counseling LLC acting as a nonprofit, Lang Smith’s credit repair complaint, a
      misleading debt negotiation commercial deceptively advertising to protect
      assets and stop harassing creditor calls, referred to a DMP as a “desperate”
      option and you have also posted as to the obscene amount of upfront fees
      charged by LHDR.  One would think you’d
      be excited to see this service available for people who DS didn’t deliver
      results. Why would CMS make trouble for the good companies? DS works if it’s
      done right, and for the right person. Unfortunately, if you can fog a mirror that’s
      enough of a qualification for most DSC’s to sell and enroll you. And let’s not
      get started on the BS attorney firms. Praise will go out to companies that
      respond well and deliver results, as well as those who admit they didn’t
      deliver results and refund the customer’s money.  Just last night I read a previous post from
      Jeremy Haas having responded to a complaint on this forum.  Good for him to at least have the decency to
      show his name. Isn’t it a shame we have to praise people for responding to a
      complaint?  We are going after the
      companies that ignore and screw people out of money and if that bothers you,
      then you likely have hidden motives.

      For the record, we don’t “blend in” at conferences. We have
      been involved in this industry and related industries for years both directly
      and indirectly. It’s just that now we are about to do something that is long
      overdue and frankly, the BBB is tied up around too much protocol to do what CMS
      does.  The FTC passes REGULATIONS. The
      enforcement of such regulations is a whole separate process. Just because a SB
      or FTC regulation is implemented doesn’t mean everyone follows the rules. The
      DOJ is who companies should fear and most don’t even know what that acronym
      stands for. It’s the Department of Justice and we feel the DOJ should be more
      involved with taking action against criminals who are lying to people and
      getting away with it.  It takes MULTIPLE
      complaints to be filed against a company before the FTC will likely invest
      their resources on an inquiry to a company. And then how long will it take the
      FTC to react? That likely 6-7 figures of unanswered consumer money. You never
      hear about the company who stole thirty five grand on American Greed; just
      those who stole millions of dollars. And by that time, it’s usually non
      recoverable.

      So, you say you are all about getting the bad players out? That’s
      what we intend to do. Helping their mistreated customers get refunds? That’s what
      we intend to do. Why not this way? We can’t talk to the owner of the company?
      WE WOULDN’T HAVE TO HUNT THEM DOWN IF THEY DIDN’T HIDE. IF fighting for
      consumers who got screwed is “harassing” then so be it. In fact, it’s not
      called harassing; it’s referred to as “being a professional nuisance.” But to
      your points, we appreciate your feedback: right, wrong or indifferent. Reality
      is that you probably know somebody who got screwed by a loan modification or
      debt settlement company. The true question is: did you help enroll them?  Do you work at a DSC and if so, do you have what
      it takes to put the name of your company here publish your success rates,
      cancellation rates, fee structure, and of course, the name of the person who handles
      complaints at your company, a contact number and a good address to deliver
      documents to for future reference? That way, if we ever receive a complaint about
      your company, we can hopefully call you to resolve it as you seem to know what
      you are talking about and it’s obvious that you would do what’s right… CMS

    • Jeffreymilman

      Consumer Mediation Services, Inc.

      Posted 07-26-2011 at 12:46 PM by jsreee

      I
      contacted, Consumer Mediation Services (CMS), in 6/2009 b/c they said
      they could help me get rid of student loan debt. Upon talking to Cam
      Sawyer, Dept Counselor, he said they could get rid of credit card dept
      as well. I paid $2995 + another $450 to get started. Now my credit is
      ruined and I owe several thousand more on my credit cards and student
      loans than when I started the program. Read below on how they say they
      can get you dept free in 12 -18 months with no negatives on your credit:

      CMS (Consumer Mediation
      Services), we are excited to offer what we believe is the safest and
      most effective debt relief process available today. In the last seven +
      years, this process has helped people to offset thousands of accounts,
      to the tune of millions of dollars. And just so we are clear, we work
      for YOU! We do not work for your creditors, your bank or your credit
      card company. This is not bankruptcy, debt consolidation, debt
      reduction, refinancing or some payment plan that can drag on for years
      and years. These other processes can easily last from 7-10 years,
      leaving you with a scarred credit rating for just as long. We
      actually assume the debt, so it is no longer your debt – it is ours,
      and we deal with the whole thing. You just hand it off to us and we do
      the rest. Any unsecured debt can go into the process: major credit
      cards, signature loans, store/gas cards, business/personal, even student
      loans! After
      you pay your fee and submit your paperwork, you provide us with enough
      money to make one more minimum payment on each account that is still
      with the original creditor, plus $43 dollars per account that we are
      doing for you. These are one time payments. If you are current on your
      payments, you just provide us with the minimum payment you would have
      sent to your creditor, plus the $43. If a minimum payment is less than
      $50 you need to bump it up to $50 so we can show a substantial payment,
      but if you are behind on payments and the creditor is asking for double
      or triple the normal minimum, you don’t have to provide the whole thing -
      we only need 2% of the balance, which will put it back down to about
      what the minimum used to be. So for an example, if you have a balance of
      $10,000 on an account, you would need to provide roughly $200 for a
      minimum payment plus $43, for a total of about $243. Again, this is a
      one-time payment. We will use the minimum payment to assume the account,
      and use the $43 for consideration payments for 3-5 months past that.
      These minimum payments need to be sent to us within two months of
      filling out your paperwork and sending the process fee. If an account is
      with a collection agency and no longer with the original creditor, you
      don’t need to provide the minimum payment or the $43. We will still work
      on the account and offset the debt, but we use slightly different
      methods that don’t require those payments.
      We focus mainly on Contract
      Law. Here’s how it happens: You’re probably already aware that in the
      contract you have with your credit cards, there is a clause that says
      they can basically change the terms and conditions whenever they want to
      – right? Well, what’s good for the goose is good for the gander. What
      we’ll do is assume the debt with their permission, and change the terms
      and conditions so they’re good for us, rather than being good for the
      credit card.
      After you have paid your fee
      and filled out the paperwork, when you get a credit card statement,
      return it to us. Instead of making out a check to XYZ Bank for the
      minimum payment, you make it out to us for the minimum payment + $43.
      Slip that into the letter they sent you, then put the whole thing in a
      bigger envelope and send it to us. When we get it, we’ll deposit your
      check made out to us, and we’ll write one of our own checks to XYZ Bank
      for the minimum payment. In that payment envelope, we also include a
      brand new set of terms and conditions, and on the check for the minimum
      payment, we put a note that says that if they cash this check, they
      agree to the new terms and conditions. And they ALWAYS cash the check –
      we’ve done this for years with literally thousands and thousands of
      accounts, and we have never had a national or regional bank send the
      check back to us. I’m sure at one time or another you’ve gotten a check
      in the mail, probably out of the blue, for $10 or $20, that on the back
      where you endorse it there’s fine print that says if you cash this check
      then you are agreeing to enroll in that company’s credit repair program
      or credit protection program or whatever their service is? This is
      exactly same thing, except we’re doing it to them instead of them doing
      it to us. Once they cash the check, they have accepted the new terms and
      conditions. Those
      terms and conditions, that new contract, is what does the job. That is
      how we assume the debt. You will also fill out an official form that is
      notarized and signed both parties that says we are assuming the debt, so
      you have something in your hand, but the new contract is what actually
      switches the debt to us. They’ll now start contacting us instead of you.
      The statements will start coming to us as well. That way you don’t have
      to deal with it. The contract now says that they are not allowed to
      charge ANY interest rate. It says that the minimum monthly payment is
      now $10 a month. It says that they are not allowed to charge any late
      fees, that they are not allowed to put any negatives on your credit
      report, and that if they ever HAVE put any negatives on your credit
      report, they have to take them off. So there is term after term that’s
      now in our favor rather than theirs. The new contract also says that if
      they BREAK any of the terms, they agree to a financial penalty of
      anywhere from $500 – $2,500 per occurrence. You know how right now if
      you send a payment late to your credit card company, then they’ll charge
      you a late fee? You’re paying a financial penalty because you broke the
      terms of the contract. Again, this is exactly the same thing except we
      are giving them a taste of their own medicine. The whole purpose of this
      procedure is to offset the debt. Because even though they accept the
      new contract and perform on it, they’re going to act as if they are
      still under the old contract. That first month that we send in the
      minimum payment, we intentionally send it late. And even though they
      accept the new contract cashing the check, when the next statement comes
      out, it will show that they are asking for more than $10 minimum
      payment, they charged a late fee, and they are asking for more than 0%
      interest. According to the new contract, they just broke the new terms
      three times on that one statement, and so we are able to apply three
      penalty fees. For the next several months, we will use that $43 you
      provided to send them payments of $10 – $15 per month. And I can tell
      you, every time they send out a new statement, there will be 3 or 4 term
      violations on there, so those penalty fees are applied over and over.
      Please, understand that when we take over the account, we are willing
      and able to pay off the entire debt. You’re simply paying us to assume
      your debt for you. We will continue to make payments month after month,
      as long as there is a balance. And again, the credit card company agrees
      to this. But they simply don’t follow the contract. When we take over
      the account, even though it may have a balance of $10,000, after 4-6
      months, because they keep breaking the terms of the new contract, they
      will owe us several thousand dollars. We could go after them for that
      amount, and who knows – in the future we may, but as of now we don’t.
      That isn’t the point. We tell them to retire the account or we WILL come
      after them for that money.
      Realize that contract law
      boils down to the very basics. There are four parts to contract law –
      the offer, the terms, the acceptance, and performance. We’ve made an
      offer of a new contract. The terms and conditions are spelled out right
      in front of them, and the acceptance is when they cash the check. From
      that point on, every time they send a statement to us, and every time
      they accept a payment from us, they are showing performance on the new
      contract. We also show performance every time we send those minimum
      payments of $10-$15/month. So we now have a contract that is spelled
      out, that both parties have accepted, and that both parties have been
      performing on for months now. Go to any judge or lawyer in the country
      and they’ll tell you that it’s pretty cut and dried at that point. It’s
      too late for either one of the parties to come back and say “Wait, I
      didn’t really want that term in there”. They
      didn’t really have a legal leg to stand on – it was pure intimidation.
      That’s why about four years ago we switched to handling everything for
      the client and assuming the debt. Now, if the credit card company tries
      to get intimidating and serve a lawsuit, the lawsuit doesn’t come
      against you – it comes against us! And it doesn’t intimidate us – being
      in court is what we do! The contract now shows that THEY are the ones
      that are in violation of the contract, not us. If they sue us with that
      situation, it’s like saying sic’em to a bulldog – not only will we be
      game for the fight, but we’ll go after them for the money they owe us.
      The creditors also realize this. So a lawsuit is simply not something
      you should have to deal with. Allow
      about 6-8 months for the debt to be offset. At the end of 12-18 months
      from when you get started, the debt will be gone and your credit report
      corrected.

    • http://twitter.com/fraudsniffer CMS

      Allison, don’t condemn the idea before you hear the results. You have made posts about New Life Financial Solutions’ scary contract, Christian Credit Counseling LLC acting as a nonprofit, Lang Smith’s credit repair complaint, a misleading debt negotiation commercial deceptively advertising to protect assets and stop harassing creditor calls, referred to a DMP as a “desperate” option and you have also posted as to the obscene amount of upfront fees charged by LHDR. One would think you’d be excited to see this service available for people who DS didn’t deliver results. Why would CMS make trouble for the good companies? DS works if it’s
      done right, and for the right person. Unfortunately, if you can fog a mirror that’s enough of a qualification for most DSC’s to sell and enroll you. And let’s not get started on the BS attorney firms. Praise will go out to companies that respond well and deliver results, as well as those who admit they didn’t deliver results and refund the customer’s money. Just last night I read a previous post from Jeremy Haas having responded to a complaint on this forum. Good for him to at least have the decency to show his name. Isn’t it a shame we have to praise people for responding to a complaint? We are going after the companies that ignore and screw people out of money and if that bothers you, then you likely have hidden motives.

      For the record, we don’t “blend in” at conferences. We have been involved in this industry and related industries for years both directlyand indirectly. It’s just that now we are about to do something that is long overdue and frankly, the BBB is tied up around too much protocol to do what CMS does. The FTC passes REGULATIONS. The enforcement of such regulations is a whole separate process. Just because a SB or FTC regulation is implemented doesn’t mean everyone follows the rules. The DOJ is who companies should fear and most don’t even know what that acronym stands for. It’s the Department of Justice and we feel the DOJ should be more
      involved with taking action against criminals who are lying to people and getting away with it. It takes MULTIPLE complaints to be filed against a company before the FTC will likely invest
      their resources on an inquiry to a company. And then how long will it take the FTC to react? That likely 6-7 figures of unanswered consumer money. You never hear about the company who stole thirty five grand on American Greed; just those who stole millions of dollars. And by that time, it’s usually non recoverable.

      So, you say you are all about getting the bad players out? That’s what we intend to do. Helping their mistreated customers get refunds? That’s what we intend to do. Why not this way? We can’t talk to the owner of the company? WE WOULDN’T HAVE TO HUNT THEM DOWN IF THEY DIDN’T HIDE. IF fighting for consumers who got screwed is “harassing” then so be it. In fact, it’s not called harassing; it’s referred to as “being a professional nuisance.” But to your points, we appreciate your feedback: right, wrong or indifferent. Reality is that you probably know somebody who got screwed by a loan modification or debt settlement company. The true question is: did you help enroll them? Do you work at a DSC and if so, do you have what it takes to put the name of your company here publish your success rates, cancellation rates, fee structure, and of course, the name of the person who handles complaints at your company, a contact number and a good address to deliver documents to for future reference? That way, if we ever receive a complaint about your company, we can hopefully call you to resolve it as you seem to know what
      you are talking about and it’s obvious that you would do what’s right… CMS

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