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I Can’t Repay My Student Loans I Had When My Husband Was in the Military. – Debbie

By on March 3, 2010
I Can’t Repay My Student Loans I Had When My Husband Was in the Military. – Debbie

“Dear Steve,

My husband was in the military and i went to college for almost 2yrs then he was deployed to europe, the family had to follow. i was unable to finish school. he then went off to the iraq war and got medically boarded out of the army. unfortunatley it took a toll on the family and we are no longer married. i have no means to pay for the student loan being a single parent. is there some kind of forgiveness plan for spouses of the military since i couldnt finish my schooling. now the loan is in default. thank you.

Debbie”

Dear Debbie,

Who are your student loans with? Are they private or government backed loans?

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About Steve Rhode

Steve Rhode is the Get Out of Debt Guy and has been helping good people with bad debt problems since 1994. You can learn more about Steve, here.

2 Comments

  1. debbie

    March 3, 2010 at 5:36 pm

    hello!
    Its threw KHEAA, i believe its government loans. They took my taxes this year and Ive tried to work out payments with the collectors who say they will only take so much or nothing at all. Its really ashame, i need to go back to school so i can make a living and support my kids and myself. The credits are basically null and void because of the time lapse. Im at a loss of what i can do. Thank you so much for your help!!!

    • Steve Rhode

      March 4, 2010 at 10:23 am

      Debbie,

      Here is how the Department of Education says you can get your loan back in shape in order to be eligible to receive additional student loans to go back to school.

      Make six agreed-upon monthly payments over a six month period. Your payment amount must be approved in advance by the Department. Every qualifying payment must be timely (received before the due date) and you cannot make all six payments as a single lump sum payment. Once your eligibility to receive additional federal financial aid has been restored after making six consecutive monthly payments, you must continue to make timely monthly payments to maintain your eligibility or else it will be permanently lost until the debt is resolved entirely. In other words, you may qualify for this program only once. – Source

      What are the collectors asking from you for a monthly payment?

      Steve

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