My Friend’s Cell Phone Company is Calling Me to Find Her. – Joe

“Dear Steve,

My friend owes money on an old cell phone bill and I received a call from this debt collection company stating that they noticed that I was a contact of hers. So I was wondering how they got this if they were going through her phone somehow and getting her contact list. So if that’s the case can they actually do that legally? Because I have no other association with her no bills or anything connected to her.

Joe”

Dear Joe,

She probably just listed you as an acquaintance on the original contract. Are they disclosing details of the debt or just looking for your friend?

Tell your friend to call the cell phone company and make payment arrangements. It’s not fair leaving you in the middle on this.

Please post your responses and follow-up messages to me on this in the comments section below.

Sincerly,


You are not alone. I'm here to help. There is no need to suffer in silence. We can get through this. Tomorrow can be better than today. Don't give up.
Damon Day - Pro Debt Coach

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2 thoughts on “My Friend’s Cell Phone Company is Calling Me to Find Her. – Joe”

  1. Because the collections industry has developed a reputation for using aggressive and intimidating tactics, the FTC works to strengthen the laws governing the manner and method by which collection agencies pursue repayment.

    Here’s an excerpt from the FTC Facts For Consumers pamphlet addressing commonly asked questions about the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act:

    May a debt collector contact anyone else about your debt?
    If you have an attorney, the debt collector must contact the attorney, rather than you. If you do not have an attorney, a collector may contact other people, but only to find out where you live, what your phone number is, and where you work. Collectors usually are prohibited from contacting such third parties more than once. In most cases, the collector may not tell anyone other than you and your attorney that you owe money.

    So if they continue to contact you they are not abiding by the Fair Debt collection Practices Act. Let your friend know that you were conacted and that they should know their right when it comes to debt collection practices.

    Refer them to the FTC site to review their rights: http://c1c.bz/xz3

    Reply
  2. Because the collections industry has developed a reputation for using aggressive and intimidating tactics, the FTC works to strengthen the laws governing the manner and method by which collection agencies pursue repayment.

    Here’s an excerpt from the FTC Facts For Consumers pamphlet addressing commonly asked questions about the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act:

    May a debt collector contact anyone else about your debt?
    If you have an attorney, the debt collector must contact the attorney, rather than you. If you do not have an attorney, a collector may contact other people, but only to find out where you live, what your phone number is, and where you work. Collectors usually are prohibited from contacting such third parties more than once. In most cases, the collector may not tell anyone other than you and your attorney that you owe money.

    So if they continue to contact you they are not abiding by the Fair Debt collection Practices Act. Let your friend know that you were conacted and that they should know their right when it comes to debt collection practices.

    Refer them to the FTC site to review their rights: http://c1c.bz/xz3

    Reply

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